El Camino (en)

deutsche Fassung

Day 1 Caminha – Pontevedra (22.March)
Now I am in Galicia – known for a lot of rain, green forests, delicious bread and above all hiking pilgrims. Santiago de Copostela, the world-famous pilgrimage site in the heart of Galicia, is for many the end of a long and arduous journey. In every hostel, every restaurant, every church, pilgrims collect stamps in their pilgrim passports. If they are complete and have sufficient stamps, they will receive the coveted pilgrimage award at the end of their journey in Santiago. For me the passport is uninteresting for this reason, because I am quasi backwards on the way, but since it allows me to stay in the cheap pilgrim accommodation I will also buy such a booklet.
Today I make it over some hill chains, through the windy, steep city Vigo, with the ferry over the bay to Cangas and further to Pontevedra. In the evening I am exhausted and stop in the picturesque old town in a small hostel. Here I meet the first bunch of real pilgrims. There is the Australian, who always leaves at six o’clock in the morning and arrives early in the next village to rest. Or the nineteen-year-old from Ireland, who walks the path for the second time already and who thinks that the personal change of his soul is only noticed much later. I feel particularly sorry for the young German, who has been mastering his path for 100 km with open blisters on his feet. Bloody and swollen, he shows me his toes. In the evening, all pilgrims treat their tired, maltreated feet and tape them with special plasters. Then route descriptions and experiences are exchanged. Together they go out to dinner. I’ll stay in the room. I’m not one of them.

Day 2 Pontevedra (23.March)
The Australian has already marched out at 6 o’clock. The other eight pilgrims also leave after a short breakfast one by one. I’m the last one. I want to enjoy every minute in the hostel, it is expensive enough. When I leave, it starts to drizzle. I’m rolling through the old town towards the cathedral. Here I buy a pilgrim’s pass for two euros, hooray! When I step outside again, the drizzle turned into a real shower. I’ll take shelter. I’m cold. A few chilly minutes later I dare to try again. I just made it across the bridge, but again it’s absolutely bucketing down. Frustrated I decide to return to my hostel. There’s no point in getting soaked to the bone. Where is the pleasure of travelling?
More pilgrims arrive in the afternoon. Similar conversations, same foot care, related experience reports. I withdraw and ponder mainstream individualism…

Day 3 Pontevedra – Santiago (24.March)
Nine o’clock. It’s not raining. But now. Right after breakfast I head off. Of course I’m the last one again, but I catch up with all the pilgrims from last night after the first half hour. The funny colours of raincoats and capes, backpack covers and umbrellas run along the roadside like on a string of pearls. A colourful march of pilgrims. I rattle through cold and wet puddle ditches into a quiet mystic forest. Everything around me is dripping. Trees get lost in the thicket. Moss covers the stones, the ground, the trunks. Rivers splash along the stony path. Everything shines, is clean, watered. Birds are chirping happily. Saturated green abundance. No one but myself and the lush nature is close by. I am glad that it is not pouring and enjoy the lush, juicy forest. But soon I leave the pilgrim path and continue on the road. I make better progress on the tarmac. I’ve got a lot of hills to climb. Again and again short, heavy rain showers whip down on me. The wind is blowing strongly from the north. Santiago lies behind a nasty chain of hills. Sad villages have to be overcome. And then it happens again. First I get annoyed, then I slowly get grumpy, finally I get angry, lose my temper and scream at the elements angrily. The fucking hill, the hacked suburb, the fucking wind and the pissing rain. I already know it! The steam is out, I feel totally stupid, but I’m relieved. Then it goes on. Eventually I reach my current hostel soaking wet and exhausted – the huge Seminario Menor, a former training centre for Catholic clergymen (priests?) To celebrate the day that I reached Santiago, I treat myself to a single room. The prospect of spending the night in a gym-like dormitory with dozens of giggling young people does not delight me at all. I drag my five heavy bags up to the third floor and along an almost endless corridor. My tiny room is like a cell. But everything I need is there. A bed, a closet, a small washbasin and a window overlooking a part of Santiago.

Day 4 Santiago (25.March)
The way to the cathedral takes less than ten minutes. I can’t get there dry. The weather’s gone completely mad. I stand in the blazing sun and behind me the sky turns to its darkest violet with rage. He sees me, points, opens a lock and – splash!!!! Hit! Frustrated and wet I have a coffee in one of the nice bars. Again and again I have to think of Hape Kerkeling’s descriptions, who couldn’t find himself in „Ich bin dann mal WEG“ to continue and rather drank another cappuccino. Finally I reach the center of Santiago. Colourful umbrellas dance across the square in a snake performance and disappear into the cathedral. Hundreds of people rushed past me with the tip of their umbrellas ahead through the clattering rain. I join the crouchers under a stone arcade and wait for the next sun window. That’s open about twenty-two and a half minutes. Time enough to collect a few impressions, take pictures and look for the nearest bar. Conclusion: Santiago won’t knock me out! The weather is partly to blame, but my motivation is also different from that of the pilgrims who have finally reached their destination after long days and exertions. For me, a new stage begins here on my way home. It’s going east from now on!

Day 5  Santiago – Miraz (26.March)
From now on, pilgrims only come towards me. I’m practically going backwards. With a tail wind and a good mood (it’s not raining yet!) I leave the city towards the north-east, back to the Atlantic Ocean. In the afternoon there is a constant drizzle. It goes up and down through an enchanting landscape. Everything is covered with moss and lichen. Dark brown horse bodies steam on wet pastures. Their snorting and neighing is both sad and comforting. Birds rush through the thicket in low flight. The trees crawl their gnarled branches into low-hanging clouds of water. Huge wind turbines roar invisibly through white mist. I cycle through a magnificent watercolour painting of flowery deep yellow, moss green and iridescent stone grey. In the twilight of the evening I reach a quiet hostel, which offers pilgrims a roof over their heads in a tiny village called Mirza. Three Britons run the accommodation on a donation basis. How lucky I am, I find out at breakfast at dawn. The winter break has been over for two days. I’m one of the first guests this year.

Day 6  Miraz – Ribadeo (27.March)
As soon as I am back on the street at eight o’clock, I meet a little man dressed in white. He waves a truck into a driveway, sees me, purposefully crosses the road and starts a conversation. In almost impeccable English he tells me his life story. He lived near London for twenty years, but his wife, son and daughter wanted to return to Portugal. Now he works as a chicken farmer day in, day out at his farm, watching his family spend their hard-earned money again. His wife was NEVER satisfied. He shakes his head. What a miserable life he leads. I’m getting cold. My feet are absorbing the moisture of the asphalt, I’m starting to tremble. Finally the man in need of sympathy has pity and releases me after twenty long chat minutes with good advice for my onward journey. It’s starting to drizzle. This is not much fun, as the path runs along a noisy main road for a few kilometres. Finally it goes again into the forest and from now on the thick clouds tear up and the sun shines again. The wind comes from behind, my clothes dry, it goes downhill. Lovely. In the early evening I reach the coast. Then it starts raining again. I quickly buy wine, bread, cheese, ham and chocolate and then look for the pilgrim hostel. It’s a tiny little house right on the cliff and looks pretty closed. When I shake the door, it opens and a blond woman looks around the corner. Gaby from Cologne. She is happy about my company, because she is alone in the hostel and is a little creepy. We do it as well as we can in the barren atmosphere, feasting wine and sandwiches and chatting late into the evening like two old friends. A wonderful encounter.

Day 7  Ribadeo – Vilapedre (28.March)
The wind has freshened up and the clouds in the sky are not promising anything good. After breakfast with Gaby we say goodbye and go our separate ways. The wind almost blows me over the railing of the bridge. Well, this can be fun! It will be. I can’t do much more than twenty kilometres further when the rain comes down on me as if I were his prey. The wind is pulling at me and my heavily loaded bike. I can hardly see the way in front of me, I see a desolate train station and save myself. It smells like piss. The timetable, which is hanging in shreds, informs me that there is NO train running today. Half a bar of chocolate comforts me temporarily. Simply delicious! These are the little things I am learning to appreciate more and more! I’m waiting. The rain’s raining. Half an hour goes by, the rain is still raining. I search the Internet for a hostel nearby and find a bed & breakfast less than 2.5 km away. When I find the given address – it is of course on a mountain – I am soaked to my underwear. A dark red villa, car in front of it, the engine still cracks. I knock on the door, peek inside. A cat stares at me. In the corridor there are wet shoes, handbag and rain-jacket is lying on a bench. Nobody opens. It pladders without stopping. Finally I see a huge ship’s bell on the wall of the house and ring strongly back and forth on the rope. A window opens on the first floor, a woman looks out, shakes her head and says that the pension will not open until May. Then she invites me for a cup of tea. I don’t know if I should cry or laugh. She opens the door, I push my bike into the hallway and follow her dripping into the spacious kitchen. It’s cold in the house, she says. The season has not yet begun, the rooms are not yet ready – black or green? The tea? Oh, uh… black, please. There’s bio biscuits and steaming Earl Grey. The nice woman is fifty years old, is called Isabel and has long black hair. Her eyes look with slight melancholy. Grey and yellow shadows frame it. We talk and after a few minutes we are already absorbed in the role of the woman in Spain, the society led by politicians who promise a lot but still do nothing. Isabel has lived here for twenty years – originally from Madrid – but no neighbour has visited her house yet. The people of Asturias are very secretive. You work, live and love only in your closest friends and family. Newcomers stay for a lifetime. Isabel is a restorer. The longer I listen to her, watch her, cuddled in a caramel brown stole, with her golden rim set glasses and her warm, shy smile, which exposes a gap in her teeth and her slightly yellowed crooked teeth… the longer we sit there and chat excitedly, the greater my wish to stay here. But Isabel feels uncomfortable, because everything is not tidy and much too cold. I better stay in a hotel. She’ll call the next town and reserve a room for me. Before I leave, she shows me her house. Every room is a beauty. Everywhere you can find bookshelves with art books and literature classics, old restored furniture, carpets, pictures, masks, apparatus, mirrors, jugs, clock faces of old clocks, potted plants, sewing machines, wooden stools, harvesters and whatnot. Everything has its place, nothing is jumbled up, each piece is put into its own scene. Nevertheless you are not in a museum, no, quite the opposite, there is a cosy atmosphere. I would love to grab a book and let myself fall into an armchair while the rain is pattering outside. A real artist has been at work here. My host explains that she renovated and restored everything in this house herself. For the last ten years. Her life partner died then, that was her mourning. At the end she leads me through her studio. It smells of solvents and paints. An ancient still life is emblazoned on an easel. The layman can also see clearly where she has already cleaned the picture. A huge table is used for work, cardboard, paint, brushes, cartons, etchings, lithographs, tools of all kinds lie around. An old printing press sits enthroned in the middle of the room. Printer cabinet and typesetting boxes are on the wall. I can’t get out of my astonishment. Oh, I wish I could stay here! At the end we say goodbye, take each other warmly in our arms and press ourselves firmly that I perceive a flow of energy again…. should I become an esoteric soul wanderer on this journey after all?! Isabel waves out the window for a long time and I slide to my hotel. Here the heating fails this night, there is no Internet and the television does not work either. And all this for the bargain price of only 35 € (two full day budgets!)

Day 8 Vilapedre – Cudillero (29.March)
The coast really is a paradise for serpentine up and down lovers. It’s not me! Today it’s called gritting your teeth. Tomorrow is the Easter weekend. I want to stay in a small hostel and rest there for a few days. Rain, sun, rain in the most beautiful alternation. I can’t stop so often to dress on and off. But as soon as the sun shines, I threaten to evaporate in my rain jacket plastic bag. Shortly before closing time I stock up with food and reach my hostel. Three days of inactivity await me. Wonderful!

Days 9, 10, 11 Cudillero (30.March– 1. April)
Walk down to the village, which crouches in a niche on the cliffs as if spat on the rocks. Back to the hostel. Reading, writing, sleeping. No Easter eggs found.

Day 12 Cudillero – Gijon (2. April)
Mir ist, als würde jemand an meinem Gepäckträger ziehen. Ich komme heute gar nicht von der Stelle. Mühsam schiebe ich lange Ziehwege hinauf und ächze gerade so bis Avilés. Der Ort ist nicht wirklich schön, Industrieschlote ragen ins Himmelgrau, lassen weißen Dampf ab. Enge Kopfsteinpflasterstraßen mit dichtem Verkehr machen das Fahren spannend. Ich komme am Bahnhofsgebäude vorbei und denke darüber nach, bis Gijon im Zug zu fahren. Leider gibt es keine menschliche Seele sondern nur eine spanische Ticketmaschine. Das ist mir gerade zu kompliziert. Ich will sowieso erstmal Oscar Niemeyer einen Besuch abstatten. Der brasilianische Architekt hat sich in der wenig reizvollen Umgebung von Avilés mit einem internationalen Kulturzentrum verewigt. Das war 2011, ein Jahr bevor er starb. Die futuristisch anmutenden Gebäude strahlen Ordnung, Ruhe und Humor aus. Genau der richtige Ort für eine kurze Verschnaufspause. Ich entschließe mich, weitere 30 Kilometer bis Gijon zu radeln. Das Wetter bessert sich, ich fahre an einer wenig befahrenen Landstraße vorrangig bergab und genieße die hügelgrüne Landschaft, mit kleinen Bauernhäuschen, Kühen und Traktoren. Sieht fast aus, wie in Süddeutschland. Gijons Peripherie ist wenig einladend. Neubauten und Tristesse empfangen mich. Es gibt hier keine Herbergen für Pilger. Ratlos fahre ich zur Altstadt und rolle den weiten Strand entlang. In einem Restaurant gönne ich mir einen asturischen Kartoffel-Fleisch-Gemüse-Eintopf und beschließe, einen 5 km entfernten Campingplatz aufzusuchen. Das stellt sich als Glücksfall heraus, denn hier gibt es für nur 6 € ein Platz in einem winzigen Pilgerzimmer. Eigentlich hatte ich mich schon auf eine Zeltnacht eingestellt. In der Nacht beginnt es allerdings erneut zu regnen und ich bin froh, im Trockenen zu liegen. Einer meiner Zimmergenossen ist Franzose, der in Brüssel lebt und in höchsten Tönen von dieser Stadt schwärmt. Er rät mir auch, unbedingt in die Bretagne zu fahren. Dort soll es wunderschön sein. Ich liebe diese Tipps von anderen Reisenden. Aber mal sehen, ob ich diesen Schlenker wirklich mache. Hügel, Wind, Regen…. ich weiß nicht.

Day 13 Gijon – Piñeres (3. April)
Weather and way mean well with me today. I enjoy cycling and make good progress, passing the coastal towns of Las Islas and Ribasella and wondering more and more about the mountains, which grow into the sky not far from the coast. From a distance I spot snow-capped peaks. This is the Cantabrian Mountains, the western extension of the Pyrenees, which runs 480 km from the Basque Country to Galicia. What I can admire from afar in the next few days is the Picos de Europa mountain range, whose highest mountain is the Torre de Cerredo with 2,648 m. The Camino Primitivo – the most pristine route of the Way of St James leads somewhere there and is currently partly snow-covered. In the evening I reach a beautiful hostel with a small garden and two other nice pilgrims. We sit in the evening sun and talk. Dan, the young American from Chicago is in a good mood and full of zest for action. Refreshingly contagious. The efforts of the last few days are a thing of the past.

Day 14 Piñeres – Comillas (4. April)
Dan tells me that there is a very nice pilgrim hostel in Comillas. He doesn’t know if there are enough beds, but there are two floors. I shouldn’t have any trouble getting in there. Well!
The day begins friendly, but no reason to praise him before the evening. In Llanes I roam a little through the old town and then have to push up an endless mountain. The path runs along the motorway. Not pretty. It rains sometimes, then it stops again. I’m getting dressed. That sucks. The landscape reconciles me however, because the mountains and the lush green with the visibly erupting spring is really beautiful. Finally, I have a nice way down a long hill into the picturesque San Vincente de la Barquera. However, my joy does not last long, because I see a dark gray-blue thunderstorm wall, which draws in from the sea and storms the sky in lightning speed and pours a terrible shower over the just still blossoming colours. The luminous mountain idyll becomes a grey-in-grey shade blurring in a white mist. Of course things are going uphill again. Panting and soaking wet, tired and bitterly annoyed, I fight for centimetres before finally being rewarded by an enchanting giant rainbow. Everything’s spinning, everything’s moving. Rain is followed by sun and then rain again. I reach Comillas with my last bit of energy. I am astonished to discover that this small town seems to be a kind of open-air museum. Everywhere, highly impressive palaces and villas rise out of splendidly maintained gardens and parks. The hostel is on a hill – I apologise for repeating myself, but that’s the way it is! Groaning, I push my cargo over rough cobblestone pavement and enter the reception area dripping wet. Patiently I wait until the woman behind the counter has finished her phone call. „I’d like a bed.“ „We are occupied!“ she replies. I think I misheard. Sure? I’ll ask. I can also sleep on my mattress, I have everything with me. „No! I can’t!“ she shakes her head. No smiles, no regrets, no kindness. I’m stunned. She’s sending me to the tourist information. It’s already closed, of course. What now? Weary I push my cargo through the narrow alleys of the picture book city. It is a tourist destination. Cheap rooms are out of the question. A crumpled pension costs 30 € for a stinking room without heating. I have no choice. I surrender to my fate

Day 15 Comillas – Santa Cruz de Benzana/Santander (5. April)
The next day the world looks a little friendlier. I still look around a little bit in the nice little place, but do without park and palace visits with costs and the visit of El Capricho – a villa built by Gaudí. I still have many kilometres to go and, above all, meters in altitude. In the sky, the wind draws a watercolour: blurred cloud white over milky sky blue becomes a contourless blue white at the end. The east wind ruffled my beautiful thoughts and I slowly start to find this coast silly. Ten kilometres before Santander I reach a small house, which is not exactly idyllic between the motorway and the country road. This is my hostel for today, at least I hope so, after yesterday’s defeat. A little woman with lively eyes and a brown curly head welcomes me. She introduces herself: Marie Niége. I’m sure she has a bed for me. „Come in, here you have a glass of water, sit down and rest!“ That’s how hospitality works…. I almost forgot! My bike is also allowed in the parlour and I get to know the other guests. A friendly mixture of French, Belgian, Dutch and even Australian. They all know each other already, because they run the same route during the day. Little by little, in the evening, the same people arrive at the accommodation that one wished for „Buen Camino! The house is old and full of life. A fireplace crackles. Pictures from South America and masks from Africa hang on the stone walls. Photo walls show cheerful groups of pilgrims, some in faded Kodakcolor from the seventies. In a small barrel there are dozens of hiking poles, the sofa is equipped with colourful cushions. Everything is made of wood, stone, ceramics. Very cosy.
There’s food for everyone at 8:00. The husband cooks. Tortillas, salad, fruit, red wine and honey liquor for dessert. They tell beautiful stories and laugh a lot. The eldest in the group is estimated to be in his mid-seventies… maybe even eighty years old. A cheerful Frenchman whose weather-beaten face is full of laughter lines. He moves very slowly, has a small hump and huge hands. How many times has he run the Camino?“ Oh,“ he says, waving his bear’s pride away, „I forgot about that!“ He laughs and then devotes himself to his red wine with relish. The next morning, he’s the first one out of the house.

Day 16 Santander – Guemes (6. April)
Marie Niége gives everyone a warm goodbye and quickly takes a group photo. I have the feeling that I am not one of many, but an individual whom I meet with interest. Things are going to be different this afternoon. The much praised pilgrim accommodation in Guemes is my destination today. But first things first. Safe clouds of veils are moving across the sky as I roll into Santander around nine o’clock in the morning. It is still too early to visit the cathedral, but the café of the brand new’Centro Botín‘ invites you to have breakfast and a view over the bay. Magnificent. The museum opened in June 2017 and is the first building by the Italian architect Renzo Piano in Spain. However, I am not looking at the current exhibition. I’m not ready for art so early in the morning. Instead I take a quick look inside the cathedral and take the ferry to the other side. Today I travel 23.5 km in the best sunshine and hardly any headwind and reach the often recommended hostel Guemes already in the early afternoon. In my room assigned to me the two-metre-human Erwin from Eckernförde welcomes me, the little chubby Claire from Yorkshire and Francesco from Verona. Erwin is funny and loud. He likes to leave early and, if possible, quickly in order to arrive early. Of course, he has always booked his hostels in advance. Travelling by train or taking a day off are taboo for him. He is a pensioner and rides 50 km of bicycles at home every day. No, no… what a question… of course this is not his first Camino. He has walked it many times and has been to this hostel many times. Next year, his wife is retiring and will join him. „Then it’s over“ drone Erwin. Gradually more pilgrims arrive. I withdraw into the garden and contemplate the wonderful landscape. The coastal strip of northern Spain, which stretches from Galicia to the Basque Country, is not called „Costa Verde“ for nothing. Green tones are available in all shades and since it is not raining at the moment, but the sun is shining, the colours glow richly and vigorously. The laundry flutters in the wind, the cow bells ring, on the large meadow you can see tired pilgrims stretching their blisters into the breeze. Two Germans count their mileage and light a cigarette with relish. A boy jumps across the meadow – he is estimated to be eleven/twelve years old. His parents look like siblings. Well-read academics. He wears ponytail, she wears glasses. Native Israelis living in London. The boy is the centre of society, which makes his father particularly happy. His ambition is obvious. His son later becomes a great one… I wonder if the son likes the Way of St James and if he really feels comfortable among all the adult pilgrims. Dinner is not served until the pilgrims arrive in the meeting room and listen to the manager’s talk. Without charm and humour, he describes the philosophy of the company and its founder in a very chanted lecture. On prepared blackboards he points to faded pictures, quotes idioms, explains projects. All this in Spanish, which is translated by a young man who speaks little good English. I feel like in elementary school, and imagine what would happen if I just jumped up and screamed very loudly HUNGER! I guess all twenty-three pilgrims would cheer me. The manager who obviously has an attention deficit would probably kick me out. Finally he ends his speech and I pray to the universe that no one will respond to his invitation to ask questions. Then there’s finally something to eat. An excellent potato soup with meat, with red wine. The conversations today are less funny. I guess it’s because of a greater self-portrayal potential in the group. Nevertheless I am happy, because I get to know many different sides of the Way of St James and its pilgrims on my unintended pilgrimage backwards.

Day 17 Guemes– Portugalete/Bilbao (7. April)
The day begins like a dream. I’m rolling downhill through dripping woods. The leafy bark of the eucalyptus trees hang down frayed. Ivy rises up over trunks shaded by scales. Brown, rusty, gold and wet, the thicket shines on the right and left of the road. Small columns of smoke move straight into the mercury-coloured sky. A good sign – there is no wind. Birds squeak, sing, whimper. The sun is occasionally blurry, like behind a frosted glass pane. I’m happy. The path winds through a shallow, swampy wetland to another ferry. On the other side of the shore, I’m unloaded on the beach. I laboriously torment myself on solid ground. I clearly have too much luggage. Then I cross the village of Laredo. On an ugliness scale of 1-10, the city would score nine points. Imaginationless skyscrapers that have had their best years for a long time. Loose building, dull, washed-out facades, loose pavement slabs. The beach is lined with a sad promenade reminiscent of Sovietschick. Occasionally, strollers come towards me. Every second person holds a leash at the end of which a dog the size of a handbag shakes. My mood is clouding and adapting to the weather. At the end of the bay begins a climb that is unparalleled. I’m pushing, because driving is out of the question. The road continues, behind every bend, I hope for an end, but it goes upwards, upwards, upwards. I felt ten kilometres groaning up the path (probably less). I’m exhausted and decide today to drive only to Portugaltee. Bilbao is less than 20 kilometres further down the bay. When I arrive in front of the hostel, I see a sign „Completo“. Seriously? Again? I’m near a nervous breakdown. Now at the latest, my slowly growing antipathy towards the Spanish Atlantic coast turns into real hatred. Damn rain, damn wind, damn hills. The staff of the pilgrim accommodation suspects a battery emergency and picks up the phone. After a few minutes she waves me in and gives me a bed in a large dormitory. Hardly to surpass in uncomfortability, but at least a roof over the head. I simply ignore the biting scent of cleaning agent and the self-talking fat glob that seems to be stuck in an armchair in the middle of the lounge. Four beds remain empty tonight. Including my bed, which was supposedly occupied, that makes five! I ask the owner of the hostel how this can be. It confirms what I have heard more often now: The pilgrims of St James do not leave it to chance whether they still get a bed in a hostel in the evening. You call in the morning and make a reservation. Preferably in several hostels and in several places. You don’t know how far you’ll make it during the day. Many guests do not cancel their reservations and when the going gets tough, they even pay for them in advance. I don’t think that’s fair.

Days 18 + 19 Bilbao (8.+9. April)
I follow the Ría de Bilbao, the river that runs for several kilometres into the country as far as Bilbao. Wretched industrial plants, rust, scrap metal and decay line the banks of the abandoned factory buildings, shattered windows and smeared house walls. Tribulation as far as the eye can see. Bilbao was one of the most important locations for heavy industry in Spain in the 19th century. The port, far inland, offered protection and shipped the valuable minerals such as iron ore, coal, zinc, lead, manganese and potash salt, which were mined in the Cantabrian Mountains. The industrial decline in the 1970s gave the city a dirty, ugly image, which it slowly got rid of thanks to modern architecture and urban planning. However, I approach on the not very attractive route and I am very curious when this picture will change. For the next two nights I rent a bed in a cheap, but desolate accommodation. Of course I want to visit the Guggenheim Museum and the old town of Bilbao. It’s Sunday. Many visitors of the city flock with me to the museum. Tomorrow would be smarter, but it’s Monday and closed. I take my time to look at every corner of this deconstructivist work of art made of glass, titanium and limestone. The Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao is considered an architectural masterpiece of the 20th century and some even claim it is „the greatest building of our time! After three hours of looking at art and architecture my feet are flat and I am hungry. Surprisingly, the sun is shining outside. It’s fitting that I was at the museum. I stroll a little further towards the old town, eat lunch somewhere and return tired and exhausted to the cosiness of my hotel. Tomorrow’s another day. Unfortunately it rains again and again the next day. City tours are not much fun when the cold gets into the bones and the wetness crawls into the camera. I do my duty to long-term travellers, i.e. I go to the laundromat and then to the post office to send superfluous luggage home. When I hear the price of the package, however, it is too late to think about whether a new purchase of the things I want to ship would not have been even cheaper. Well then! In the afternoon I stumble trembling from one bar to the next in the old town, eat pintxos (small pieces of white bread covered with all kinds of delicacies), drink red wine, write a diary and try to keep my spirits up.

Day 20 Bilbao – San Sebastian (10. April)
I’ve had enough! I’ll take the train. The stage to the coast goes over many altitude meters. That’s not exactly a stick of paper, even in good conditions, but it’s like torture in continuous rain and headwinds. I’m not in the best mood right now anyway. I buy a ticket for six euros thirty and let myself be rocked through rainy, dreiste landscapes. Unfortunately I will not visit Guernica and also not the picturesque hostel with Catholic monks somewhere in the mountains. But in this weather, you can lose your appetite for everything. Two and a half hours later I reach San Sebastian. The pilgrim hostel at the end of the village is still closed. Not funny! A second hostel is on the other end of San Sebastian. That means turning around and driving back. As it is of course just starting to rain again, I am completely soaked again in only 5 km. I book a bed in a youth hostel room with the same charm. In the evening, only red wine and chocolate will help. In bars and bottle!

180410_00

Days 21 + 22 San Sebastian (11.+12. April)
It’s pouring. I’m writing. It’s still pouring. For three days! The hostel is not so ugly at second glance. I have the four-bed room all to myself and dedicate myself entirely to my blog. From time to time I rush to the supermarket to get the necessities (wine and chocolate). Even the sun shines for half a day and I take a walk to the promenade. Here everything that can run is romping around and enjoys the few rays of the sun, because the rain is already back in the afternoon. In the evening I snuggle up in my bed, put my headphones over my ears and dedicate myself to real film classics… my current highlight: „Some like it hot“.

Day 23  San Sebastian – Biarritz (13. April)
After a week I finally get back on the bike and leave San Sebastian. The rain pauses for a moment to say goodbye. I climb a ridge on the other side of a small bay and reach an enchanting path high above the sea. Cows and horses graze comfortably on the slopes of steep pastures, the city noise fades away and gives way to the sounds of nature. The cliffs seem to be pushed upwards from the sea, they lie like sliding plates on green moss. I enjoy one last magnificent view of San Sebastian and then roll down to the picturesque town of Hondarriba. In a medieval tavern I eat my last Spanish Pinxtos before I leave Spain by ferry again. Hasta Luego España! Vive la France!

Advertisements

El Camino (de)

english version

Tag 1 Caminha – Pontevedra (22.März)
Nun bin ich in Galizien – bekannt für viel Regen, grüne Wälder, leckeres Brot und vor allem wandernde Pilger. Der weltberühmte Wallfahrtsort Santiago de Copostela liegt im Herzen Galiziens und ist für viele das Ende einer langen, beschwerlichen Wanderschaft. In jeder Herberge, jedem Restaurant, jeder Kirche sammeln die Pilger Stempel in ihren Pilgerpass. Wenn sie lückenlos und ausreichende Stempel vorweisen können, erhalten sie am Ende ihrer Reise in Santiago die begehrte Pilgerauszeichnung. Für mich ist der Pass aus diesem Grunde uninteressant, denn ich bin ja quasi rückwärts unterwegs, doch da er mir gestattet, in den billigen Pilgerunterkünften zu nächtigen werde ich mir auch so einen Stempelheftchen zulegen.
Mein erster Tag in Galizien ist anstrengend. Heute schaffe ich es aber immerhin unter Dauernieselregen über einige Hügelketten, durch die windige, steile Stadt Vigo hindurch, mit der Fähre über die Bucht nach Cangas und weiter bis nach Pontevedra. Abends bin ich total geschafft und kehre in der malerischen Altstadt in einem kleinen Hostel ein. Hier treffe ich auf den ersten Pulk echter Pilger. Da ist der Australier, der immer schon um sechs Uhr früh losläuft und entsprechend früh im nächsten Ort ankommt, um sich auszuruhen. Oder der Neunzehnjährige aus Irland, der den Weg schon zum zweiten Mal läuft und der meint, dass man die persönliche Veränderung seiner Seele erst viel später wahrnimmt. Der junge Deutsche, der seit 100 km mit offenen Blasen an den Füßen seinen Weg meistert, tut mir besonders leid. Blutig und geschwollen zeigt er mir seine Zehen. Alle Pilger versorgen am Abend ihre müden, geschundenen Füsse und kleben sie mit Blasenpflastern ab. Dann werden Wegbeschreibungen und Erlebnisse ausgetauscht. Man geht zusammen essen. Ich bleibe im Zimmer. Ich gehöre nicht dazu.

Tag 2 Pontevedra (23.März)
Der Australier ist bereits um 6 Uhr losmarschiert. Auch die anderen acht Pilger laufen nach einem kurzen Frühstück einer nach dem anderen los. Ich bin die letzte. Jede Minute in der Herberge will ich auskosten, sie ist schließlich mit siebzehn Euro fünfzig teuer genug! Als ich losfahre, fängt es leicht an zu nieseln. Ich rolle durch die Altstadt Richtung Kathedrale. Hier erstehe ich für zwei Euro erstmal einen Pilgerpass, Hurra! Als ich wieder nach draußen trete, ist aus dem Nieselregen ein echter Schauer geworden. Ich stelle mich unter. Mir ist kalt. Einige fröstelnde Minuten später wage ich einen erneuten Versuch. Ich schaffe es gerade über die Brücke, dann schüttete es wieder aus allen Eimern. Frustriert beschließe ich, in meine Herberge zurückzukehren. Es hat ja keinen Sinn, sich bis auf die Knochen durchnässen zu lassen. Wo liegt da der Genuss am Reisen?
Am Nachmittag treffen weitere Pilger ein. Ähnliche Gespräche, gleiche Fußversorgungen, verwandte Erfahrungsberichte. Ich ziehe mich zurück und grüble über Mainstreamindividualismus…

Tag 3 Pontevedra – Santiago (24.März)
Neun Uhr. Es regnet nicht. Jetzt aber. Gleich nach dem Frühstück presche ich los. Klar bin ich wieder die letzte, aber die Pilger der letzten Nacht hole ich schon nach der ersten halben Stunde alle ein. Wie an einer bunten Perlenschnur ziehen sich die lustigen Farben von Regenjacken und –capes, Rucksacküberzügen und Regenschirmen am Straßenrand entlang. Ein bunter Pilgergänsemarsch. Ich rattere durch nasskalte Pfützengräben in einen stillen Wunderwald. Alles um mich herum trieft. Bäume verlieren sich im Dickicht. Moos überzieht die Steine, den Boden, die Stämme. Bäche plätschern entlang des steinigen Weges. Alles glänzt, ist sauber, gewässert. Vögel zwitschern vergnügt. Gesättigter, grüner Überfluss. Niemand ausser mir und der üppigen Natur ist in der Nähe. Ich freue mich, dass es gerade nicht schüttet und genieße den satten, saftigen Wald. Doch bald schon verlasse ich den Pilgerweg und fahre auf der Straße weiter. Auf dem Asphalt komme ich besser voran. Viele Hügel muss ich überwinden. Immer wieder peitschen kurze, heftige Regenschauer auf mich nieder. Der Wind bläst kräftig aus Norden. Santiago liegt hinter einer fiesen Hügelkette. Traurige, triste Ortschaften müssen überwunden werden. Und dann packt es mich erneut. Erst bin ich genervt, dann werde ich langsam sauer, schließlich ungehalten und zum Schluß verliere ich meine Beherrschung und schreie wütend die Elemente an. Den beschissenen Hügel, den behackten Vorort, den verfluchten Wind und den pissigen Regen. Kenne ich ja schon! Der Dampf ist abgelassen, ich komme mir total bescheuert vor, bin aber erleichtert. Danach geht es weiter. Endlich erreiche ich patschnass und erschöpft meine heutige Herberge – das riesige Seminario Menor, ein ehemaliges Ausbildungszentrum für katholische Geistliche (Priester?) Zur Feier des Tages, dass ich Santiago erreicht habe, gönne ich mir ein Einzelzimmer. Die Aussicht mit Dutzenden gackernden Jugendlichen in einem turnhallenartigen Schlafsaal zu nächtigen, erquickt mich gerade gar nicht. Ich schleppe meine fünf schweren Taschen hinauf in die dritte Etage und einen schier endlosen Gang entlang. Mein winziges Zimmer gleicht einer Zelle. Aber es ist alles da, was ich brauche. Ein Bett, ein Wandschrank, ein kleines Waschbecken und ein Fenster, mit Blick über einen Teil Santiagos.

Tag 4 Santiago (25.März)
Der Weg zur Kathedrale dauert weniger als zehn Minuten. Ich schaffe es nicht, trocken dort anzukommen. Das Wetter spielt komplett verrückt. Ich stehe in knallender Sonne und hinter mir färbt sich der Himmel vor Wut in sein dunkelstes Violett. Er sieht mich, zielt, öffnet eine Schleuse und – Platsch!!! getroffen! Frustriert und nass genehmige ich mir einen Kaffe in einer der hutzeligen Bars. Immer wieder muss ich an Hape Kerkelings Schilderungen denken, der sich in “Ich bin dann mal WEG” nicht aufraffen konnte, weiterzugehen und lieber noch einen Cappuccino trank. Schließlich gelange ich doch ins Zentrum Santiagos. Bunte Regenschirme tänzeln in einer Schlangenperformance über den Platz und verschwinden in der Kathedrale. Hunderte Menschen hasten mit Schirmspitze voran durch den prasselnden Regen an mir vorüber. Ich geselle mich zu den Kauernden unter eine Steinarkade und warte auf das nächste Sonnenfenster. Das ist ungefähr zweiundzwanzigeinhalb Minuten geöffnet. Zeit genug ein paar Eindrücke zu sammeln, Fotos zu schießen und sich die nächste Bar zu suchen. Fazit: Santiago haut mich nicht vom Hocker! Zum Teil ist das Wetter schuld, doch meine Motivation ist auch eine andere, als die der Pilger, die nach langen Tagen und Strapazen endlich ihr Ziel erreicht haben. Für mich beginnt ab hier eine neue Etappe auf meinem Weg nach hause. Es geht von nun an ostwärts!

Tag 5 Santiago – Miraz (26.März)
Pilger kommen mir ab jetzt nur noch entgegen. Ich fahre ja quasi rückwärts. Mit Rückenwind und guter Laune (es regnet noch nicht!) verlasse ich die Stadt Richtung Nord-Osten, zurück an den Atlantik. Am Nachmittag setzt unaufhörlicher Nieselregen ein. Es geht Berge hoch und runter durch eine mutterseeleneinsame Zauberlandschaft. Alles ist von Moos und Flechten überzogen. Dunkelbraune Pferdeleiber dampfen auf nassen Weiden. Ihr Schnauben und Wiehern ist gleichermaßen traurig und tröstlich. Vögel rauschen im Tiefflug durch das Dickicht. Die Bäume kraken ihre knorrigen Ästen in tiefhängende wasserschwere Wolken. Riesige Windräder tosen unsichtbar durch weißen Nebel. Ich fahre durch ein prachtvolles Aquarell von blumigem Sattgelb, troffendem Moosgrün und changierendem Steingrau. Im Dämmerlicht des Abends erreiche ich eine stille Herberge, die in einem winzigen Örtchen namens Mirza Pilgern ein Dach über dem Kopf bietet. Drei Briten führen die Unterkunft auf Spendenbasis. Was für ein Glück ich habe, erfahre ich beim Frühstück im Morgengrauen. Seit zwei Tagen ist die Winterpause vorbei. Ich bin eine der ersten Gäste in diesem Jahr.

Tag 6  Miraz – Ribadeo (27.März)
Kaum, dass ich um kurz nach acht wieder auf der Straße bin, begegne ich einem kleinen weiß gekleideter Mann. Er winkt einen LKW in eine Einfahrt, sieht mich, überquert zielstrebig die Straße und beginnt ein Gespräch. In nahezu tadellosem Englisch schildert er mir seine Lebensgeschichte. Zwanzig Jahre lebte er in der Nähe von London, doch Frau, Sohn und Tochter wollten zurück nach Portugal. Nun schuftet er als Hühnerfarmer tagein, tagaus in seinem Betrieb und sieht dabei zu, wie seine Familie sein sauerverdientes Geld wieder ausgibt. Seine Frau sei NIE zufrieden. Er schüttelt seinen Kopf. Was führt er doch für ein miserables Leben. Mir wird kalt. meine Füsse saugen die Feuchtigkeit des Asphalts auf, ich beginne zu zittern. Endlich hat der mitteilungsbedürftige Mann Mitleid und entlässt mich nach langen zwanzig Plauderminuten mit guten Ratschlägen für meine Weiterfahrt. Es beginnt zu nieseln. Das macht wenig Spaß, denn der Weg zieht sich einige Kilometer an einer lauten Hauptstraße entlang. Endlich geht es wieder in den Wald und von nun an reissen die dicken Wolken auf und die Sonne strahlt mir auf den Pelz. Der Wind kommt von hinten, meine Klamotten trocknen, es geht bergab. Herrlich. Am frühen Abend erreiche ich die Küste. Dann beginnt es erneut zu Regnen. ich kaufe noch schnell Wein, Brot, Käse, Schinken und Schokolade ein und suche dann die Pilgerherberge. Es ist ein winziges Häuschen direkt an der Klippe und sieht ziemlich geschlossen aus. Als ich an der Tür rüttle, öffnet sie sich und eine strubbelblonde Frau guckt um die Ecke. Gaby aus Köln. Sie freut sich über meine Gesellschaft, denn sie ist alleine in der Herberge und gruselt sich ein wenig. Wir machen es uns so gut es in der kargen Atmosphäre geht gemütlich, schmausen Wein und Sandwiches und plappern bis spät in den Abend wie zwei uralte Freundinnen. Eine wundervolle Begegnung.

Tag 7 Ribadeo – Vilapedre (28.März)
Der Wind hat kräftig aufgefrischt und die Wolken am Himmel verheißen nichts Gutes. Nach einem gemeinsamen Frühstück mit Gaby verabschieden wir uns und ziehen jeder unserer Wege. Mich fegt der Wind fast über das Geländer der Brücke. Na das kann ja heiter werden! Wird es auch. Ich schaffe es mehr schlecht als recht zwanzig Kilometer weiter als sich der Regen auf mich stürzt, als sei ich seine Beute. Der Wind zerrt an mir und meinem schwer beladenen Fahrrad. Ich kann kaum den Weg vor mir erkennen, da sehe ich eine trostlose Bahnstation und rette mich hinein. Es stinkt nach Pisse. Der in Fetzen hängende Fahrplan gibt Auskunft, dass heute KEIN Zug mehr fährt. Ein halbe Tafel Schokolade tröstet mich vorübergehend. Einfach lecker! Das sind die kleinen Dinge, die ich immer mehr zu schätzen lerne! Ich warte. Der Regen regnet. Eine halbe Stunde vergeht, der Regen regnet immer noch. Ich suche im Internet nach einer Herberge in der Nähe und finde ein Bed& Breakfast keine 2,5 km entfernt. Als ich die angegebene Adresse finde – sie liegt selbstverständlich auf einem Berg – bin ich bis auf die Unterwäsche durchnässt. Eine dunkelrote Villa, Auto davor, der Motor knackt noch. Ich klopfe an die Tür, spähe hinein. Eine Katze starrt mich an. Im Flur stehen nasse Schuhe, Handtasche und Regenjecke liegen auf einem Bänkchen. Niemand öffnet. Es pladdert ohne Unterlass. Schließlich sehe ich eine riesige Schiffsglocke an der Hauswand und bimmle kräftig an dem Tau hin und her. Da öffnet sich ein Fenster in der ersten Etage, eine Frau schaut heraus, schüttelt den Kopf und sagt, die Pension mache erst im Mai auf. Dann lädt sie mich auf eine Tasse Tee ein. Ich weiß nicht, ob ich weinen oder lachen soll. Sie öffnet die Tür, ich schiebe mein Fahrrad in den Flur und folge ihr triefend in die geräumige Küche. Es ist kalt im Haus, sagt sie. Die Saison hat noch nicht begonnen, die Zimmer sind noch nicht fertig – schwarz oder grün? Der Tee? Ach, äh… schwarz bitte. Es gibt Biokekse und dampfenden Earl Grey. Die nette Frau ist fünfzig Jahre alt, heißt Isabel und hat lange schwarze Haare. Ihre Augen blicken mit leichter Melancholie. Graugelbe Schatten umrahmen sie. Wir unterhalten uns und sind bereits nach wenigen Minuten vertieft in die Rolle der Frau in Spanien, die Gesellschaft angeführt von Politikern, die viel versprechen und doch nichts halten.Dann erläutert sie die introvertierte Seele der Asturier. Isabel lebt hier schon seit zwanzig Jahren – ursprünglich kommt sie aus Madrid –aber es kam sie noch kein Nachbar in ihrem Haus besuchen. Die Menschen in Asturien sind sehr verschlossen. Man arbeitet, lebt und liebt nur in seinem engsten Freundes und Familienkreis. Zugereiste bleiben Zugereiste, ein Leben lang. Isabel ist Restauratorin. Je länger ich ihr zuhöre, sie beobachte, eingekuschelt in eine karamellbraune Stola, mit ihrer Goldrand gefassten Brille und ihrem herzlichen, schüchternen Lächeln, was eine Zahnlücke und ihre leicht vergilbten schiefen Zähne entblößt… je länger wir da sitzen und angeregt plaudern, je größer ist mein Wunsch, hier zu bleiben. Doch Isabel fühlt sich unwohl, denn es ist alles nicht aufgeräumt und viel zu kalt. In einem Hotel sie ich besser aufgehoben. Sie ruft im Nachbarort an und reserviert dort ein Zimmer für mich. Bevor ich sie verlasse, zeigt sie mir noch ihr Haus. Jedes Zimmer ist ein Prachtstück. Überall locken Wandflächendeckende Bücherregale mit Kunstbänden und Literaturklassikern, alte restaurierte Möbelstücke, Teppiche, Bilder, Masken, Apparate, Spiegel, Krüge, Zifferblätter alter Uhren, Topfpflanzen, Nähmaschinen, Holzhocker, Erntegeräte und was weiß ich nicht noch alles. Alles hat seinen Platz, nichts ist voll gerümpelt, jedes Stück ist in seine eigen Szene gesetzt.Dennoch befindet man d´sich nicht etwa in einem Museum, nein, ganz im Gegenteil, es herrscht eine gemütliche Atmosphäre. Am liebsten würde ich mir ein Buch schnappen und mich in einen Sessel plumpsen lassen, während draußen der regen prasselt. Hier ist eine echte Künstlerin am Werk gewesen. Meine Gastgeberin erklärt, dass sie alles, in diesem Haus selber renoviert und restauriert hätte. Über die letzten zehn Jahre. Ihr Lebenspartner ist damals gestorben, das war ihre Trauerbewältigung. Zum Abschluss führt sie mich noch durch ihr Atelier. Es riecht nach Lösungsmitteln und Farben. Auf einer Staffelei prangt ein uraltes Stilleben. Deutlich sieht auch der Laie, wo sie das Bild bereits gesäubert hat. Ein riesiger Tisch dient zum Arbeiten, Pappen, Farben, Pinsel, Kartons, Radierungen, Lithografien, Werkzeuge jeder Art liegen herum. Eine alte Druckerpresse thront in der Mitte des Raumes. Druckerschrank und Setzkästen stehen an der Wand. Ich komme aus dem Staunen nicht mehr heraus. Ach, könnte ich doch hierbleiben! Am Ende verabschieden wir uns, nehmen uns herzlich in die Arme und drücken uns fest, dass ich schon wieder einen Energiefluss wahrnehme…. sollte ich etwa auf dieser Reise doch noch zum esoterischen Seelenwanderer werden!? Isabel winkt noch lange aus dem Fenster und ich schlittere zu meinem Hotel. Hier fällt in dieser Nacht die Heizung aus, es gibt kein Internet und der Fernseher geht auch nicht. Und das für den Schnäppchenpreis für nur 35 € ( zwei ganze Tagesbudgets!!!)

Tag 8 Vilapedre – Cudillero (29.März)
Die Küste ist wirklich ein Paradies für Serpentinen-Auf-und-Ab-Liebhaber. Ich bin das nicht! Heute heißt es Zähne zusammenbeißen. Morgen beginnt das Osterwochenende. Ich will mich in einer kleinen Herberge einmieten und dort einige Tage ausruhen. Regen, Sonne, Regen in schönster Abwechslung. Ich kann gar nicht so oft anhalten, um mich an und wieder auszupellen. Doch sobald die Sonne scheint, drohe ich in meiner Regenjackenplastiktüte zu verdampfen. Kurz vor Ladenschluss decke ich mich mit Lebensmitteln ein und erreiche mein Hostel. Drei Tage Nichtstun erwarten mich. Herrlich!

Tag 9, 10, 11 Cudillero (30.März– 1. April)
Spaziergang zum Ort hinunter, der wie an den Felsen gespuckt in einer Klippennische kauert. Zurück zur Herberge. Lesen, schreiben schlafen. Keine Ostereier gefunden.

Tag 12 Cudillero – Gijon (2. April)
Mir ist, als würde jemand an meinem Gepäckträger ziehen. Ich komme heute gar nicht von der Stelle. Mühsam schiebe ich lange Ziehwege hinauf und ächze gerade so bis Avilés. Der Ort ist nicht wirklich schön, Industrieschlote ragen ins Himmelgrau, lassen weißen Dampf ab. Enge Kopfsteinpflasterstraßen mit dichtem Verkehr machen das Fahren spannend. Ich komme am Bahnhofsgebäude vorbei und denke darüber nach, bis Gijon im Zug zu fahren. Leider gibt es keine menschliche Seele sondern nur eine spanische Ticketmaschine. Das ist mir gerade zu kompliziert. Ich will sowieso erstmal Oscar Niemeyer einen Besuch abstatten. Der brasilianische Architekt hat sich in der wenig reizvollen Umgebung von Avilés mit einem internationalen Kulturzentrum verewigt. Das war 2011, ein Jahr bevor er starb. Die futuristisch anmutenden Gebäude strahlen Ordnung, Ruhe und Humor aus. Genau der richtige Ort für eine kurze Verschnaufspause. Ich entschließe mich, weitere 30 Kilometer bis Gijon zu radeln. Das Wetter bessert sich, ich fahre an einer wenig befahrenen Landstraße vorrangig bergab und genieße die hügelgrüne Landschaft, mit kleinen Bauernhäuschen, Kühen und Traktoren. Sieht fast aus, wie in Süddeutschland. Gijons Peripherie ist wenig einladend. Neubauten und Tristesse empfangen mich. Es gibt hier keine Herbergen für Pilger. Ratlos fahre ich zur Altstadt und rolle den weiten Strand entlang. In einem Restaurant gönne ich mir einen asturischen Kartoffel-Fleisch-Gemüse-Eintopf und beschließe, einen 5 km entfernten Campingplatz aufzusuchen. Das stellt sich als Glücksfall heraus, denn hier gibt es für nur 6 € ein Platz in einem winzigen Pilgerzimmer. Eigentlich hatte ich mich schon auf eine Zeltnacht eingestellt. In der Nacht beginnt es allerdings erneut zu regnen und ich bin froh, im Trockenen zu liegen. Einer meiner Zimmergenossen ist Franzose, der in Brüssel lebt und in höchsten Tönen von dieser Stadt schwärmt. Er rät mir auch, unbedingt in die Bretagne zu fahren. Dort soll es wunderschön sein. Ich liebe diese Tipps von anderen Reisenden. Aber mal sehen, ob ich diesen Schlenker wirklich mache. Hügel, Wind, Regen…. ich weiß nicht.

Tag 13 Gijon – Piñeres (3. April)
Wetter und Weg meinen es heute gut mit mir. Ich genieße das Radfahren und komme gut voran, passiere die Küstenstädtchen Las Islas und Ribasella und wundere mich mehr und mehr über das Gebirge, was sich unweit der Küste in den Himmel bäumt. Von Ferne mache ich schneebedeckte Gipfel aus. Das ist das Kantabrische Gebirge, die westliche Verlängerung der Pyrenäen, die 480 km vom Baskenland bis nach Galizien verläuft.  Was ich in den nächsten Tagen von Ferne bewundern kann ist die Gebirgskette Picos de Europa, deren höchster Berg derTorre de Cerredo mit 2.648 m ist. Der Camino Primitivo – die ursprünglichste Jakobswegroute führt irgendwo dort entlang und ist momentan zu Teilen verschneit. Am Abend erreiche ich eine wunderschöne Herberge mit kleinem Gärtchen und zwei netten anderen Pilgern. Wir sitzen in der Abendsonne und erzählen. Dan, der junge Amerikaner aus Chicago ist voller guter Laune und Tatendrang. Herzerfrischend ansteckend. Die Anstrengungen der letzten Tage sind wie verpufft.

Tag 14 Piñeres – Comillas (4. April)
Von Dan erfahre ich, dass es in Comillas eine sehr schöne Pilgerherberge gibt. Ob die genug Betten hat, weiß er nicht, aber es gibt zwei Etagen. Ich sollte keine Probleme haben, dort unterzukommen. Naja!
Der Tag beginnt freundlich, kein Grund ihn allerdings schon vor dem Abend zu loben. In Llanes streife ich ein wenig durch die Altstadt und muss dann einen endlosen Berg nach oben schieben. Der Weg zieht sich entlang der Autobahn. Nicht schön. Mal regnet es, dann hört es wieder auf. Ich ziehe mich an-aus-an. Das nervt. Die Landschaft versöhnt mich allerdings, denn die Berge und das satte Grün mit dem sichtbar ausbrechenden Frühling ist wirklich schön. Schließlich sause in schönstem Tempo einen langen Hügel hinab in das malerische San Vincente de la Barquera. Meine Freude dauert allerdings nicht lange, denn ich erspähe eine dunkelgraublaue Gewitterwand, die vom Meer hereinzieht und in Windeseile den Himmel erstürmt und einen fürchterlichen Schauer über die gerade noch blühenden Farben gießt. Das leuchtende Bergidyll wird zu einer in weißem Nebel verschwimmenden Grau-in-Grauschattierung. Selbstverständlich geht es nun wieder bergan. Keuchend und klatschnass, müde und bitter genervt erkämpfe ich Zentimeter um Zentimeter, um schließlich kurz darauf von einem zauberhaften Riesenregenbogen belohnt zu werden. Alles dreht sich, alles bewegt sich. Auf Regnen folgt Sonne und dann kommt wieder Regen. Ich erreiche Comillas mit meinem letzten Bisschen Energie. Erstaunt stelle ich fest, dass es sich bei diesem Städtchen um eine Art Freiluftmuseum zu handeln scheint. Überall ragen höchst eindrucksvolle Paläste und Villen aus prachtvoll gepflegten Gärten und Parks. Die Herberge liegt auf einer Anhöhe – ich bitte um Verzeihung, dass ich mich wiederhole, aber so ist es nun mal! Ächzend schiebe ich meine Fracht über ruppiges Kopfsteinpflaster und betrete tropfnass die Rezeption. Geduldig warte ich ab, bis die Frau hinter dem Tresen ihr Telefonat beendet hat. “Ich hätte gerne ein Bett.” “Wir sind belegt!” erwidert sie. Ich glaube, mich verhört zu haben. Sicher? frage ich nach. Ich kann auch auf meiner Isomatte schlafen, habe alles dabei. “Nein! Geht nicht!” sie schüttelt kurz den Kopf. Kein Lächeln, kein Bedauern, keine Freundlichkeit. Ich bin fassungslos. Sie schickt mich zur Touristeninformation. Die hat selbstverständlich schon geschlossen. Was nun? Ermattet schiebe ich meine Fracht durch die engen Gassen der Bilderbuchstadt. Hier tobt der Tourist. An billige Zimmer ist nicht zu denken. Eine schrumpelige Pension verlangt für ein stinkendes Zimmer ohne Heizung 30 €. Mir bleibt nichts anderes übrig. Ich gebe mich geschlagen und meinem Schicksal hin.

Tag 15 Comillas – Santa Cruz de Benzana/Santander (5. April)
Am nächsten Tag sieht die Welt etwas freundlicher aus. Ich schaue mich noch ein wenig in dem netten Örtchen um, verzichte aber auf kostenpflichtige Park- und Palastbesuche und die Besichtigung des El Capricho – einer von Gaudí gebauten Villa. Vor mir liegen noch viele Kilometer und vor allem Höhenmeter. Am Himmel zeichnet der Wind ein Aquarell: verwischendes Wolkenweiß über milchigem Himmelblau wird am Ende zu einem konturlosen Blauweiß. Der Ostwind zerzaust meine mühevoll hervorgekramten schönen Gedanken und ich beginne langsam, diese Küste doof zu finden. Zehn Kilometer vor Santander erreiche ich ein kleines Haus, was zwischen Autobahntrasse und Landstraße nicht gerade idyllisch liegt. Das ist meine Herberge für heute, so hoffe ich zumindest, nach der Schlappe von gestern. Eine kleine Frau mit quirligen Augen und braunem Lockenkopf heißt mich willkommen. Sie stellt sich vor: Marie Niege. Sicher hat sie ein Bett für mich. “Komm’ herein, hier hast du ein Glas Wasser, setz’ dich und ruh’ dich aus!” So geht das mit der Gastfreundschaft…. hatte ich fast vergessen! Mein Fahrrad darf ebenfalls in die gute Stube und ich lerne die anderen Gäste kennen. Eine freundliche Mischung aus Franzosen, Belgiern, Holländern und sogar einer Australierin. Sie alle kennen sich bereits, denn sie laufen am Tag dieselbe Strecke. Nach und nach trudeln am Abend dieselben Leute in der Unterkunft ein, denen man morgens “Buen Camino!” gewünscht hat. Das Haus ist alt und voller Leben. Ein Kamin bollert. An den Steinwänden hängen Bilder aus Südamerika und Masken aus Afrika. Fotowände zeigen fröhliche Pilgergruppen, zum Teil in verblichenem Kodakcolor aus den Siebzigern. In einer kleinen Tonne stecken dutzende Wanderstöcke, das Sofa ist mit bunten Kissen ausgestattet. Alles ist aus aus Holz, Stein, Keramik. Urgemütlich.

Um acht Uhr gibt es Essen für alle. Der Ehemann kocht. Tortillas, Salat, Obst, dazu Rotwein und zum Nachtisch Honigschnaps. Es werden schöne Geschichten erzählt und viel gelacht. Der Älteste in der Runde ist schätzungsweise Mitte siebzig… vielleicht sogar schon achtzig Jahre alt.  Ein gut gelaunter Franzose, dessen wettergegerbtes Gesicht voller Lachfältchen ist. Er bewegt sich sehr langsam, hat einen kleinen Buckel und riesige Hände. Den Camino läuft er bereits zum wievielten Mal?” Ach” sagt er und winkt mit seiner Bärenpranke ab “das habe ich vergessen!” Er lacht und widmet sich dann wieder genüßlich seinem Rotwein. Am nächsten Morgen ist er der Erste, der das Haus verlässt.

Tag 16 Santander – Guemes (6. April)
Marie Niége drückt jeden herzlich zum Abschied und macht noch schnell ein Gruppenfoto. Ich habe das Gefühl, nicht eine von vielen zu sein, sondern ein Individuum, dem man mit Interesse begegnet. Anders soll es bereits am Nachmittag kommen. Die viel gepriesene Pilgerunterkunft in Guemes ist mein heutiges Ziel. Aber eins nach dem anderen. Ungefährliche Schleierwolken ziehen über den Himmel, als ich gegen neun Uhr morgens in Santander einrolle. Es ist noch zu früh für eine Besichtigung der Kathedrale, aber das Café des brandneuen ‘Centro Botín’  lädt mit einem Frühstück zum Blick über die Bucht ein. Grandios. Das Museum hat im Juni 2017 eröffnet und ist das erste Bauwerk des italienischen Architekten Renzo Piano in Spanien. Die aktuelle Ausstellung schaue ich mir allerdings nicht an. Ich bin so früh am Morgen noch nicht aufnahmefähig für Kunst. Stattdessen werfe ich einen kurzen Blick in die Kathedrale und setze mit der Fähre auf die andere Seite über. Heute lege ich in aller Gemütsruhe bei schönstem Sonnenschein und kaum Gegenwind nur schlappe 23,5 km zurück und erreiche bereits am frühen Nachmittag die oft empfohlene Herberge Guemes. In meinem mir zugewiesenen Zimmer begrüßt mich der Zweimetermensch Erwin aus Eckernförde, die kleine pummelige Claire aus Yorkshire und Francesco aus Verona. Erwin ist witzig und laut. Er läuft ja gerne zeitig los und nach Möglichkeit auch schnell, um früh anzukommen. Selbstverständlich buche er seine Herbergen schon immer im voraus. Zug fahren oder einen Tag pausieren sind für ihn tabu. Er ist Rentner und fährt zuhause täglich 50 km Fahrrad. Nein, nein… was für eine Frage… das ist selbstverständlich nicht sein erster Camino. Er ist ihn schon oft gelaufen und in dieser Herberge war er auch schon öfter. Nächstes Jahr geht seine Frau in Rente und wird ihn dann begleiten. “Dann ist Schluß mit lustig” dröhnt Erwin. Nach und nach treffen weitere Pilger ein. Ich ziehe mich in den Garten zurück und betrachte die wundervolle Landschaft. Den Küstenstreifen Nord-Spaniens, der sich von Galizien bis ins Baskenland erstreckt, nennt man nicht ohne Grund “Costa Verde”. Grüntone gibt es in allen Nuancen und da es gerade nicht regnet, sondern die Sonne scheint, leuchten die Farben satt und kräftig. Die Wäsche flattert im Wind, die Kuhglocken bimmeln, auf der großen Wiese sieht man müde Pilger ihre Blasen in die Brise strecken. Zwei Deutsche zählen ihre gelaufenen Kilometer und stecken sich genüßlich eine Zigarette an. Ein Junge springt über die Wiese – er ist schätzungsweise elf/zwölf Jahre alt. Seine Eltern sehen aus wie Geschwister. Belesene Akademiker. Er trägt Pferdeschwanz, sie eine Brille. Gebürtige Israelis, die in London leben. Der Junge ist der Mittelpunkt der Gesellschaft, was ganz besonders den Vater freut. Sein Ehrgeiz ist nicht zu übersehen. Sein Sohn wird später mal ein ganz Großer… Ich frage mich, ob der Sohn gerne den Jakobsweg geht und ob er sich unter all’ den erwachsenen Pilgern wirklich wohl fühlt. Das Abendessen wird erst serviert, wenn sich die Pilger im Versammlungsraum einfinden und den Ausführungen des Managers brav lauschen. Dieser schildert ohne Charme und Witz in einem sehr heruntergeleierten Vortrag die Philosophie des Hauses und Gründers. Auf vorbereiteten Wandtafeln zeigt er auf verblichene Bilder, zitiert Redewendungen, erklärt Projekte. Das alles auf Spanisch, was von einem jungen Mann, der wenig gutes Englisch spricht Häppchenweise übersetzt wird. Ich komme mir vor, wie in der Grundschule, und stelle mir vor was passieren würde, wenn ich einfach aufspringen und ganz laut HUNGER! schreien würde. Ich schätze, alle dreiundzwanzig Pilger würden mich bejubeln. Der Manager, der ganz offensichtlich ein Aufmerksamkeitsdefizit hat, würde mich vermutlich rausschmeissen. Endlich beendet er seine Ausführungen und ich bete ins Universum, dass seiner Aufforderung, Fragen zu stellen, niemand nachkommen möge. Dann gibt es endlich etwas zu Essen. Eine vorzügliche Kartoffelsuppe mit Fleisch, dazu Rotwein. Die Unterhaltungen sind heute weniger lustig. Ich schätze es liegt an einem größeren Selbstdarstellungspotenzial in der Gruppe. Trotzdem bin ich froh, denn ich lerne auf meiner unbeabsichtigten Rückwärtspilgerei viele unterschiedliche Seiten des Jakobsweges und seiner Pilger kennen.

Tag 17 Guemes– Portugalete/Bilbao (7. April)
Traumhaft beginnt der Tag. Ich rolle durch triefende Wälder bergab. Die blättrigen Rinden der Eukalyptusbäume hängen zerfranst herab. Efeu rankt sich über schuppenschattierte Stämme an ihnen herauf. Braun, rostig, gold und nass glänzt das Dickicht rechts und links der Straße. Kleine Rauchsäulen ziehen schnurgerade in den quecksilberfarbenen Himmel. Ein gutes Zeichen – es ist windstill. Vögel qietschen, trällern, fiepen. Die Sonne zeigt sich ab und zu verschwommen, wie hinter einer Milchglasscheibe. Ich bin glücklich. Durch ein flaches, sumpfartiges Feuchtgebiet schlängelt sich der Weg bis zu einer weiteren Fähre. Auf der anderen Uferseite werde ich am Strand von Bord gelassen. Mühsam quäle ich mich auf festen Untergrund. Ich habe eindeutig zu viel Gepäck dabei. Dann durchquere ich den Ort Laredo. Auf einer Hässlichkeitsskala von 1-10 würde die Stadt sicher neun Punkte erzielen. Fantasielose Hochhäuser, die ihre besten Jahre lange hinter sich haben. Loses Bauwerk, triste, verwaschene Fassaden, lose Gehwegplatten. Den Strand  säumt eine traurige Promenade, die an Sovietschick denken lässt. Vereinzelt kommen mir Spaziergänger entgegen. Jeder zweite hält eine Leine an deren Ende ein handtaschengroßer Hund zittert. Meine Stimmung trübt sich und passt sich dem Wetter an. Am Ende der Bucht beginnt ein Anstieg, der seines Gleichen sucht. Ich schiebe, denn an fahren ist nicht zu denken. Immer weiter zieht sich die Straße, hinter jeder Kurve, hoffe ich auf ein Ende, doch es geht nach oben, nach oben, nach oben. Gefühlte zehn Kilometer ächze ich den Weg hinauf (vermutlich sind es weniger). Ich bin fix und fertig und beschließe heute doch nur bis Portugaltee zu fahren. Bilbao ist noch knappe 20 Kilometer weiter die Bucht hinunter. Als ich vor der Herberge ankomme, erspähe ich ein Schild “Completo”. Ernsthaft? Schon wieder? Ich bin nahe eines Nervenzusammenbruchs. Spätestens jetzt schlägt meine langsam gewachsene Antipathie der spanischen Atlantikküste gegenüber in waschechten Haß um. Verfluchter Regen, verfluchter Wind, verfluchte Hügel. Die Angestellte der Pilgerunterkunft ahnt einen akkuten Notfall und greift zum Telefon. Nach einigen Minuten winkt sie mich herein und gibt mir ein Bett in einem Großraumschlafsaal. An Ungemütlichkeit kaum zu übertreffen, doch immerhin ein Dach über dem Kopf. Den beißenden Putzmittelgeruch und den selbstgesprächeführenden Fettkloß der in einem Sessel in der Mitte des Aufenthaltsraumes festzustecken scheint, ignoriere ich einfach. Vier Betten bleiben heute nacht leer. Inklusive meines Bettes, was ja angeblich auch belegt war, macht das fünf! Ich frage den Besitzer der Herberge, wie das denn sein kann. Er bestätigt, was ich nun schon häufiger gehört habe: Die Jakobspilger überlassen es nicht dem Zufall, ob sie noch ein Bett in einer Herberge am Abend bekommen. Sie rufen schon morgens an und reservieren. Am besten gleich in mehreren Herbergen und in mehreren Orten. Man weiß ja noch nicht, wie weit man es am Tage schafft. Viele Gäste sagen dann ihre Reservierungen nicht ab, und wenn es hart auf hart kommt, bezahlen sie diese sogar schon im Voraus. Ich finde das unfair.

Tag 18 + 19 Bilbao (8.+9. April)
Ich folge der Ría de Bilbao, dem Fluss, der sich über einige Kilometer bis nach Bilbao ins Land zieht. Elende Industrieanlagen, Rost, Schrott und Zerfall säumen die Ufer der verlassene Fabrikgebäude, zersplitterte Fenster, beschmierte Hauswände. Trübsal soweit das Auge blickt. Bilbao zählte im 19. Jahrhundert zu einer der wichtigsten Standorte der Schwerindustrie Spaniens. Der Hafen, weit im Landesinneren bot Schutz und verschiffte die wertvollen Mineralien wie Eisenerz, Kohle, Zink, Blei, Mangan und Kalisalz, die im Kantabrischen Gebirge abgebaut wurden. Der industrielle Niedergang in den Siebziger Jahren des vergangenen Jahrhunderts verlieh der Stadt ein schmutziges, hässliches Image, was sie Dank moderner Architektur und Städteplanung langsam wieder los wurde. Ich nähere mich allerdings über die wenig attraktive Route und bin ganz gespannt, ab wann sich dieses Bild wandelt. Für die nächsten zwei Nächte miete ich ein Bett in einer billigen, wenn auch trostlosen Unterkunft. Selbstverständlich will ich mir das Guggenheim Museum und die Altstadt Bilbaos angucken. Es ist Sonntag. Viele Besucher der Stadt strömen mit mir ins Museum. Morgen wäre ein Besuch sicher schlauer, aber da ist Montag und geschlossen. Ich lasse mir Zeit, schaue mir jeden Winkel des dekonstruktivistischen Baukunstwerkes aus Glas, Titan und Kalkstein an. Das Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao gilt als architektonischen Meisterwerks des 20. Jahrhunderts und einige behaupten gar, es sei “das großartigste Gebäude unsere Zeit!” Nach drei Stunden Kunst und Architektur gucken sind meine Füße platt und ich habe Hunger. Erstaunlicherweise scheint draußen die Sonne. Passend, dass ich im Museum war. Ich schlendere noch ein wenig in Richtung Altstadt, esse irgendwo zu Mittag und kehre müde und erschöpft in die Gemütlichkeit meines Hotels zurück. Morgen ist ja auch noch ein Tag. Leider regnet es am nächsten Tag immer wieder. Stadtbesichtigungen machen wenig Spaß wenn die Kälte in die Knochen und die Nässe in die Kamera kriecht. Ich erfülle Langzeitreisenden Pflichten, das heißt ich gehe in den Waschsalon und anschließend zur Post, um überflüssiges Gepäck nach hause zu schicken. Als ich den Preis für das Päckchen höre, ist es allerdings zu spät, sich darüber Gedanken zu machen, ob eine Neuanschaffung der Dinge, die ich versenden will, nicht sogar kostengünstiger gewesen wäre. Nun denn! In der Altstadt strauchle ich am Nachmittag zitternd von einer Bar in die nächste, esse Pintxos (kleine Stückchen Weißbrot mit allerlei Leckereien belegt) trinke Rotwein, schreibe Tagebuch und versuche meine Laune bei Laune zu halten.

Tag 20 Bilbao – San Sebastian (10. April)
Mir reicht’s! Ich nehme den Zug. Die Etappe bis an die Küste geht über sehr viele Höhenmeter. Das ist auch bei schönen Bedingungen nicht gerade ein Pappenstiel, aber bei Dauerregen und Gegenwind kommt es einer Folter gleich. Meine Laune ist zur Zeit sowieso nicht die beste. Ich kaufe mir ein Ticket für sechs Euro dreizig und lasse mich durch verregnete, triste Landschaften schuckeln. Guernica werde ich leider nicht besuchen und auch nicht die malerische Herberge bei katholischen Mönchen irgendwo in den Bergen. Aber bei dem Wetter kann einem die Lust an allem vergehen. Zweieinhalb Stunden später erreiche ich San Sebastian. Die Pilgerherberge am Ende des Ortes ist noch geschlossen. Nicht witzig! Eine zweite Herberge liegt am anderen Ende San Sebastians. Das heißt umdrehen und zurückfahren. Da es selbstverständlich gerade wieder anfängt zu regnen, bin ich in nur 5 km wieder komplett durchnässt. Ich buche ein Bett in einem Jugendherbergszimmer mit eben diesem Charme. Am Abend hilft nur Rotwein und Schokolade. Flaschentafelweise!

180410_00

Tag 21 + 22 San Sebastian (11.+12. April)
Es schüttet. Ich schreibe. Es schüttet weiter. Drei Tage lang! Die Herberge ist auf den zweiten Blick gar nicht so häßlich. Das Vierbettzimmer habe ich ganz für mich alleine und widme mich voll und ganz meinem Blog. Ab und zu husche ich zum Supermarkt, um mich mit dem Nötigsten (Wein und Schokolade) zu versorgen. Einen halben Tag scheint sogar die Sonne, und ich mache einen Spaziergang zur Promenade. Hier tummelt sich alles, was laufen kann und erfreut sich der wenigen Sonnenstrahlen, denn schon am Nachmittag ist der Regen wieder da. Abends kuschle ich mich in mein Bett, stülpe meine Kopfhörer über die Ohren und widme mich echten Filmklassikern … mein aktuelles Highlight: “Manche mögen’s heiß”.

Tag 23  San Sebastian – Biarritz (13. April)
Nach einer Woche steige ich schließlich wieder auf’s Rad und verlasse San Sebastian. Zum Abschied hält der Regen kurz inne. Ich erklimme einen Bergrücken auf der anderen Seite einer kleinen Bucht und gelange auf einen zauberhaften Weg hoch über dem Meer. Kühe und Pferde grasen gemütlich an den Hängen steiler Weiden, der Stadtlärm verebbt und macht den Geräuschen der Natur Platz. Die Klippen scheinen wie aus dem Meer nach oben gedrückt, sie liegen wie rutschende Platten auf grünem Moos. Ich genieße einen letzten grandiosen Blick auf San Sebastian und rolle dann hinunter in das pittoreske Städtchen Hondarriba. In einer mittelalterlich-hutzeligen Kneipe esse ich meine letzten spanische Pinxtos bevor ich Spanien wieder per Fähre verlasse. Hasta Luego España! Vive la France!

From Lisboa to Porto (en)

6. March 2018 – 21. March 2018       deutsche Fassung


After saying goodbye to my friend I move to another hostel, due to the still pending rain. For four days I crawl into the farthest corner of a lively party hotel and think about encounters in a foreign country, fleeting moments and what remains of it, about the sometimes enviable ignorance of the youth, about future, friendship, life and whatever else there is. So a few thousand cubic litres of rainwater are raining over the city, while I bathe my rather melancholic mood in red wine.
Eventually the weather calms down and I start to drive along the west coast of Portugal to the north, highly unmotivated. All of a sudden I lack a goal, a driving anticipation, the desire to discover. Everything seems heavy and dull. I just drive to make the trip. My biggest wish is that it stays dry and the wind comes from behind. How different travel suddenly feels.

Lisbon is not directly on the open sea, but in a deep bay on the banks of the Tejo River. Along this coast my way leads me first to the west to Estoril and Cascais, two tourist destinations shortly before the bay opens to the Atlantic Ocean. The storm has spat sea entrails on the shore paths which makes the progress quite difficult. Even if the sun shows itself in parts, it is cold and stormy. Time and again, the water edge flaneur runs the risk of taking an involuntary salt water shower. In the evening I reach the „Praia do Guincho“, a famous surfing beach. Windsurfers, kite surfers and surfers will find perfect wind and wave conditions here. As the beach is located in a nature reserve, it has so far been spared from mass tourism. At dusk it lies abandoned before me. Far and wide no camping site or suitable shrub to protect my tent from the wind. I am forced to place myself in a parking lot to a few motorhomes and hope that the night will remain dry and free of thunder storms.

From now on my way leads through the Sintra Cascais National Park, through beautiful forests, past gorges and seemingly impenetrable thickets. The road rises steadily in curves. It’s sweaty but worth the effort. In Sintra I renounce climb to the old town, which lies steeply on the cliffs. This is, of course, real cultural outrage. Nevertheless, in my travel phlegm I cannot get involved in Unesco World Heritage castles and palaces flooded with tourists, which means first to push my fully packed bicycle up the hill in strong winds and under low rain clouds. No No No….. I rather stop in a small café, order homemade soup followed by a thick piece of chocolate cake and release myself from mitigating circumstances according to my significant state of mind.

When the grey clouds dive into their deepest black, which I don’t really see as a personal threat – sugar high by the chocolate cake drug – I get back on my bike and head for Ericeira, a place on the coast that is within an acceptable afternoon distance. No less than ten minutes later, I am fighting against persistent precipitation attacks. Under merciless downpours I cycle bravely for three hours along the noisy main road and am not happy about anything anymore. In these hopeless moments of a cyclist, the most important muscle needed for a long-distance cycling trip is trained – the mind (at least from my point of view). I pant and moan on the brittle asphalt edge. The hills are high and steep and climbing is made more difficult by too much luggage, headwind and whipping raindrops. I start to moan, which soon becomes a grumble. My displeasure increases with every turn of the pedal. My rage blazes and at some point a tirade of abuse bursts out of me, which would steal the show from any volcanic eruption. Like glowing lava I scream the most primitive faecal curse terms into the wet ether – often so often in a row that almost a new word results from it – Fuckpissshitmuckturdpisssfuck. This takes five minutes and costs so much strength and in the end the quality of my vocal cords that I fall silent in a miserable grunt. Nothing has changed in the external circumstances. The rain keeps pouring down on me, the wind didn’t even blink and the hills just stay where they are, steep and high. I don’t feel any better on the outside, but inside I was able to get rid of my rage with this screaming attack. Thus I have now shifted my focus from anger about the external conditions to anger about myself as a raging, ridiculous being. The rest of the afternoon I spend being angry with myself, then making fun of myself, then being ashamed, finally analyzing my behaviour, forgiving myself in the end and praising myself for my tenacity. In this and similar ways I have endured myself since the beginning of this journey. Not at all amusing. I would have shaken off every other traveling companion with this behaviour long ago. Since this is not possible, I try to get to know and tame my own demon better and better. This tops any therapy!

In Ericeira I head for a supermarket to get some food for the next days. Ten kilometres behind this town, somewhere in nowhere (near the tiny village of Ribamar), there is a hostel where I plan to close myself off until the rain stops. The route description from the Internet is perfect and soon I find myself in front of an inconspicuous detached house. There is no sign of a hostel anywhere. My soaking wet existence almost wants to lose courage when eventually the front door opens on my stormy ringing and two young questioning women’s faces marvel at my regrettable appearance. Am I in the right place in the hostel „Dos Hermanas“? Their faces lighten up. „Of course, come in!“ These moments also belong to the spices of a planned-free journey. Just now there is not the slightest reason for cheerfulness and just a tiny moment later the world resembles a pony farm. In a kind of lucky frenzy I push my bicycle into the garage and enter a normal house. A spacious living room with fireplace, kitchen with everything around it, bathroom with „BATH TUB“ and a room with two bunk beds, in which I may live alone, since at this time of year nobody but me comes up with the idea of taking a holiday here. How lucky I really am, however, soon turns out when the two sisters – they come from Sweden, by the way – tell me that they only returned yesterday from their winter stay near Stockholm. If I had just rung the doorbell a day earlier, no one would have been there. The two sisters bought the house together with their two brothers last summer to make their dream come true and open up a hostel. Moa and Natalie are 32 and 28 years old. They will now learn Portuguese and try to combine their livelihood with the pleasant things in life, i.e. get to know people, listen to their stories and stay in the sea and nature. Below us lies a gorgeous bay, where the wild weather rages and the waves crash against the long beach. In summer this is certainly an ideal spot for surfing. Right now I’m just happy to get rid of my wet clothes and take a hot bath. The weather can go sit on a tack!

The storm lasts four days. Time to sleep, write, think. I’m getting along great with Moa and Natalie. Natalie studied nutrition and dietetics and prepares breakfast in the morning. Her home-baked rolls are the culinary highlight of the day. At the weekend they take me to a farmers‘ market in the nearby Mafra. All products seem to come straight from the field. Fruit and vegetables shimmer under wet tarpaulins in the strongest colours. But my purchases are limited to two tomatoes, a banana and an apple. When I want to pay, the salesman looks at me irritated and waves me friendly away. His eyes say: „Oh, what the hell! Take it with you. That’s so little, what should I charge you?“ Full of gratitude I shine my most beautiful „Obrigada“ towards him. This is Portugal – the only country in western Europe where I experience this generosity.

Am morgen meiner fünften Nacht im temporär schwedischen Heim hat sich das Wetter beruhigt und weht mich mit zartem Seitenwind weiter die Küste nach Norden. Ich brauche zwei Tage bis ich Nazaré erreiche. Der Weg dorthin führt an traumhaften Buchten und schroffen Felswänden vorbei, durch versnobte Villengegenden mit ihren (mir verhassten) Golfplätzen, vorbei an stillen, fast ausgestorbenen Dörfern, durch duftende Felder mit Broccoli und Wirsing und durch immer wieder unwegsames Gelände. Ich genieße es, endlich wieder draußen zu sein und zumindest eine Nacht hinter den Dünen mein Zelt aufzubauen.

Mein Bewegungselan ist zurückgekehrt und ich bin gespannt auf Nazaré. Ein Fischerort, der für die höchsten Wellen der Welt(!) bekannt ist. Hier finden Surfmeisterschaften mit Profis rund um den Globus statt. Wellen von 20-30 Metern Höhe, sagt man werden gesurft. Unvorstellbar.
Da es gerade wieder zu nieseln beginnt, kehre ich in ein kleines Hostel ein. Der Besitzer, ein großer schwere Portugiese hat eine winzige Schürze um die Taille gewickelt und fuchtelt mit riesigen Pranken in der Luft herum, während seine donnernde Stimme erklärt, er habe heute den Bürgermeister zu Gast. Ich müsse entschuldigen, er müsse kochen und den Tisch decken “… und, ähem… “ es wäre von höchster Wichtigkeit und ausgesprochen hilfreich, wenn ich mich heute Abend in dem kleinen Speiseraum nicht blicken ließe. Er hätte wichtige Geschäfte mit dem Bürgermeister zu besprechen. Verblüfft starre ich ihn an und verschwinde im Mehrbettzimmer, was ich wieder ganz für mich alleine habe. Am nächsten Tag regnet es in Strömen. Antonio, der Gastwirt, serviert das Frühstück und plumpst neben mir an den Tisch. Ob ich gut geschlafen hätte und sie nicht zu laut gewesen seien. Ohne eine Antwort abzuwarten, verkündet er mit kräftigem Gelächter, dass der Abend ein voller Erfolg für ihn und die Stadt gewesen sei. Er konnte den Bürgermeister überzeugen, die Marke “Nazaré” und ihren Ruf als Surfmekka besser zu schützen. Welche Maßnahmen er dafür vorschlägt, bleibt mir allerdings ob seiner wirren wenn auch unmöglich zu überhörenden Ausführungen, schleierhaft. Mit einer unbändigen Energie und fast schon brutaler Stimmgewalt tönt er seine Ansichten über dies und jenes und ganz besonders Frau Merkel mit ihrer gescheiterten Europapolitik durch das Speisezimmer. Die übrigen Gäste sind längst verschwunden, mich aber interessiert diese ausdrucksvolle Persönlichkeit und so bleibe ich sitzen. Mamas selbst gemachte Konfitüre wird mir gönnerhaft als Nachschlag angeboten, während der Hausherr über die verheerende Portugiesische Wirtschaftssituation doziert. Hach, es sei ein Dilemma! Mord und Totschlag, Korruption und Vernichtung! Ginge es nach ihm, würde Portugal die Europäische Union selbstverständlich sofort verlassen. Aber die Politiker seien alle unfähig und obendrein auch korrupt. Er könnte heulen Wut. Ob ich denn wisse, dass die verheerenden Brände im vergangenen Jahr, die riesige Waldgebiete nördlich von Nazaré die gesamte Westküste entlang vernichtet hätten, ob ich denn wisse, dass das vom Staat initiierte Brände waren? Ja! Damit die staatliche Feuerwehr etwas zu tun bekäme. Der Beweis läge auf der Hand. Die Brände haben verheerend gewütet, aber ausgerechnet einen kleinen Luxusort an der Küste verschont, wo hochkarätige Politiker und ihre schwer edelsteinbesetzten Gattinnen pflegen, ihren Urlaubschampagner zu trinken. Was für ein Mysterium! Du wirst es sehen, wenn du dort lang fährst.

Er hat nicht untertrieben. Ohne die Monsterwellen gesehen zu haben, was ich sehr bedaure, verlasse ich Nazaré am kommenden Tag – dicke graue Regenwolken drohen schon wieder am Horizont – und gelange wenig später in die Gegend der Waldbrände. Mich erfasst eine tiefe Trauer. Vernichteter Wald, so weit das Auge reicht. Und wirklich… der kleine Ort Moel liegt still an der Küste, eingebettet in dickem Grün. Kein Halm hat hier Feuer gefangen. Antonio hat sich das vermutlich nicht ausgedacht. Der Tag begleitet mich mit einer wechselhaften Kulisse von Regen, Sonnen und viel Wind. Als ich am Abend Figueira da Foz erreiche, wird meine Zähigkeit noch einmal auf die Probe gestellt, denn ich muss eine hohe Brücke überqueren, über die unentwegt LKWs an mir vorbei donnern. Der starke Seitenwind fordert mich zusätzlich heraus. Ich stelle auf Autopilot – Blick starr nach vorn, Spur halten, einatmen, ausatmen, strampeln. Nach gefühlter Ewigkeit ist die andere Seite erreicht und ich werde mit einem häßlichen Neubau-Ort belohnt. Das Hostel ist erbärmlich, aber draußen schlafen ist nicht möglich bei dem unbeständigen Wetter.

Auch der folgende Tag ist wechselhaft und anstrengend. Mal schüttet es, dass ich kaum etwas sehe, dann scheint wieder die Sonne, dass ich in meiner Regenkluft fast ersticke. Am Abend erreiche ich einen Ort, an dem es eine Fähre zu einer Landzunge gibt, auf der es sich sicher bis Porto schön flach entlang radeln lässt… denke ich. Müde und hungrig bahne ich mir mühsam meinen Weg durch düstere graue Marine-Industrieanlagen bis zum Fähranleger. Ich habe Glück. In zehn Minuten kommt das Boot. Die Sonne ist bereits untergegangen. Es ist windig und eiskalt. Zitternd warte ich darauf, an Deck gehen zu können, doch werde bitter enttäuscht. Der Fährmann erklärt, dass es seit gestern eine Art Ersatzverkehr gibt. Fahrräder werden einen Monat lang nicht transportiert. Ich bitte, bettle, flehe, fluche… der Mann verzieht nicht die kleinste Mine und bleibt stur. Das bedeutet, ich muss den ganzen Weg durchs Industriegebiet zurückfahren und mir schnell noch eine Bleibe suchen, denn der Himmel färbt sich am Horizont in schauerliches Dunkelviolett, was bedrohlich und rasant näher kommt. Mit dem Rest meiner Energie, hochgezogenen Schultern und der Bestimmtheit eines Kamikazepiloten rase ich in die nächstgelegene Stadt und schleudere mit schotterspritzender Bremsung vor die Tore einer Jugendherberge, gerade als die ersten faustgroßen Regentropfen auf den Asphalt klatschen. Geschafft! Die Herbergsinnenausstattung stammt aus den frühen Siebzigern. Die Betten sind hier und da notdürftig repariert und knarren bei der kleinsten Bewegung. Alte Wolldecken mit ausgefransten Kanten, halb aus der Wand hängende Kleiderhaken und rostige Metallstuhlbeine schlummern im faden Licht des Achtbettzimmers. Nur eine kleine, fahrige Russin teilt es mit mir. Aus dem Nachbarzimmer scheppert hysterisches Mädchengekreisch. Die Russin schnarcht wie ein Bauarbeiter und ich… ? ich fühle mich seltsam geborgen. In meiner kläglich geschrumpften Provianttasche finde ich noch eine Notration. In solchen Momenten schmecken Tütensuppen köstlich. Ehrlich!

Am nächsten Tag radle ich schnurstracks zum Bahnhof, kaufe für vier Euro ein Ticket und treffe eine gute Stunde später in Porto ein. Genug der Schikanen, es ist Zeit, mich auch mal wieder zu freuen.

Und Porto erfreut mich! Schon als ich aus dem wunderschönen, gefliesten Inneren des Bahnhofsgebäude trete, erfasst mich eine Welle der Wonne. Ich verweile im Sonnenlicht, stehe einfach nur da und betrachte die schmalen Häuser, die Turmspitzen, die sich hoch und runter windenden Gassen, die bemalten, blauen Fliesen, Menschen an Deck der Sight Seeing Doppeldecker, Kellner in weißen Hemden und schwarzen Schürzen, schweißglitzernde Bauarbeiter, Busfahrer, Hunde, bunte Blumentöpfe, grüne Fensterläden, Schornsteine und moosbewachsene Ziegel, Straßenlaternen und filigrane Balkongeländer, Schaufenster mit angeklebten zerfledderten Plakaten oder blitzblanken Auslagen, flatternde Werbebanner, Straßenmusikanten… Hach! Zu Fuß schlendere ich durch die steilen Straßen zu meinem Hostel, mache Momentaufnahmen und lasse mich verzaubern.

Ohne Sehenswürdigkeitenabklapperplan, lasse ich mich die nächsten vier Tage ziellos durch die Gassen Portos treiben. Viele Fassaden der alten Häuser sind gefliest, oft mit blauen oder grünen handgemalten Motiven, die sogar auf einigen wichtigen Gebäuden der Stadt vollständige Bilder ergeben – ganze Geschichten erzählen. Die Balkone sind schmiedeeisern und in aufwendige Muster gebogen. Fensterläden oder Jalousien liegen wie Augenlider über den Rahmen. An den Haustüren prangen Türklopfer, mal als Löwenmaul, mal als Hand oder Gesicht. Überall strahlen Graffiti von den Fassaden. Lebendige Kunst, gegenwärtig, vergänglich. Street-Art gehört zum heutigen Portugal, wie die antiken gemusterten Fliesen. Fassaden, die Geschichten erzählen. Botschafter der Zeit. Manche Häuser sind so verrottet, das eine Renovierung fast ausgeschlossen scheint. Vermutlich werden sie früher oder später abgerissen. Dann wachsen dort Neubauten, wie ich in den Bezirken ausserhalb des Zentrums oft sehen kann. Nicht unbedingt immer gut gelungen.


I roam a park and land unnoticed in the centre. Narrow alleys meander through the old town as a pedestrian zone. Souvenir shops, tobacco shops, bakers and restaurants patiently wait for customers to the right and left of the path. At one corner, father and son are sitting on the sidewalk. Both turn the crank of a barrel organ with one hand. The other hand receives a carefully folded punch card, which disappears into a slot of the organ by turning the crank and comes to light again on the other side. The boy is estimated to be ten years old. He wears a poodle hat and a brown fur-lined jacket. A kind of cockatoo nests on his shoulder and nibbles on the boy’s ear. He keeps a straight face, but cranks at a constant speed, while his father, dressed in a bordeaux-red knitted sweater, has a strange smile on his face and lovingly moves his instrument. He gently swings back and forth, rhythmically raising and lowering his foot, to which a cuff with small bells is attached. The two have built themselves a kind of stage, which makes their performance look more like a spectacle than a begging. On a wooden block stands a white, lively cock, which occasionally jerks with its head. A garden gnome guards him. Books and other percussion instruments lie at the father’s feet. The boy sits on a blanket, next to him an ancient little suitcase filled with punch cards for his lyre. Stacks of books, open boxes with antique equipment round off the scenario. As soon as the boy has a break, he sits back on a tiny stool and delves into a comic book – Tintin (Tim and Struppi). Cluster of people take pictures and clap enthusiastically. The coins jingle in the dented hat, the father thanks with a modest smile and nod of his head. The two look as if they came from a different time, as does the music. I wonder if they’re travellers. I wonder where they’re from. Is the boy enjoying the show as much as his father? What do they do, where do they live and where is the boy’s mother? As I continue on my way, I imagine an adventurous story about the musicians. I refuse to think that they simply live around the corner and that their staging should be a mere tourist attraction.

Porto lies on the river Douro. A huge steel bridge connects them to the other bank. Eiffel built it. There’s a tram upstairs, cars downstairs. The city is extremely photogenic from the other side. Old fishing boats with huge wooden barrels lie like on a string of pearls in front of the panorama of the colourful house promenade. In Porto there is a palpable cosiness slumbering. People sit in the sun, purring a Portuguese chat here and there, linger on park benches, feed seagulls and dream. I take up their positive energy, give myself to their rhythm and am just happy to be here.

In der Innenstadt gibt es einen Buchladen, für den man Eintritt zahlen muß, um dort In the city centre there is a bookstore, for which one has to pay entrance, in order to get in. You have to buy the tickets in another shop in front of which a long queue of people is lolling. K.J. Rowling, who lived on welfare at the time, lived in Porto for some time, was inspired by the city and especially by this bookstore „Livraria Lello“ and wrote parts of the Harry Potter novels here. As soon as I enter this bookstore I know what magic was the mother of her inspiration and although it seems like a journey through time and is simply wonderful there, I am also overcome by a certain melancholy and the premonition of a mass tourism that will probably soon become more and more infested with Porto.


My days pass with walks and taking pictures. Otherwise I rest and gather strength for the next stage. I’m leaving town the way I came – by train. I don’t have to drive through an ugly industrial area. In a small suburb, one hour before the city gates, a wonderful footpath welcomes me, which runs for miles through the dunes and is forbidden for cyclists. However, since there is no walker to be seen far and wide, I refrain from obedience and rattle cheerfully over the narrow wooden planks. The weather is pleasant, the sea rough and windy and my mood perfect when I arrive in the small border village Gaminha in the evening. On the other side of the river lies Spain. My last night in Portugal I spend in the lonely parking lot next to the ferry, and shortly after nine o’clock the next morning I transfer to Spain. I’m in Galicia!

180321_06

…ich bin nicht so DICK, wie ich aussehe … ich habe ALLE Klamotten an, die ich habe!

Von Lissabon bis Porto (de)

6. März 2018 – 21. März 2018       englisch version


Nach dem Abschied von meiner Freundin miete ich mich in einem Hostel ein, denn es hängt weiterhin drohender Regen in der Luft. Vier Tage verkrieche ich mich in die hinterste Ecke eines quirligen Party-Hostels und sinne nach über Begegnungen in der Fremde, die Flüchtigkeiten von Augenblicken, über das, was davon bleibt, über die manchmal beneidenswerte Unwissenheit der Jugend, über Zukunft, Freundschaft, das Leben und was es sonst noch so gibt. So verregnen einige Tausend Kubikliter Regenwasser über der Stadt, während ich meine eher melancholische Grundstimmung in Rotwein bade.
Irgendwann beruhigt sich das Wetter und ich raffe mich höchst unmotiviert auf, die Westküste Portugals gen Norden entlang zu fahren. Mir fehlt mit einem Male ein Ziel, eine treibende Vorfreude, die Lust am Entdecken. Alles erscheint schwer und trist. Ich fahre einfach nur, um Strecke zu machen. Dabei ist mein größter Wunsch, dass es trocken bleibt und der Wind von hinten kommt. Wie anders sich das Reisen plötzlich anfühlt.

Lissabon liegt nicht direkt am offenen Meer, sondern in einer tiefen Bucht am Ufer des Tejo. Entlang dieser Küste führt mich mein Weg also zuerst Richtung Westen nach Estoril und Cascais, zwei touristische Ausflugsziele kurz bevor die Bucht sich dem Atlantik öffnet. Der Sturm hat die Uferwege über weite Strecken wütend mit Meeresinnereien bespuckt, so dass ich mehr schlecht als recht vorankomme. Auch wenn die Sonne sich streckenweise zeigt, ist es kalt und stürmisch. Immer wieder läuft der Wasserkantenflaneur Gefahr, eine unfreiwillige Salzwasserdusche zu nehmen. Am Abend erreiche ich den “Praia do Guincho”, einen berühmten Surferstrand. Sowohl Wind- als auch Kite-Surfer und Wellenreiter finden hier perfekte Wind- und Wellenbedingungen. Da der Strand in einem Naturschutzgebiet liegt, blieb er bisher vom Massentourismus verschont. In der Abenddämmerung liegt er verlassen vor mir. Weit und breit kein Campingplatz oder geeigneter Strauch, der mein Zelt vor dem Wind schützt. Notgedrungen platziere ich mich auf einem Parkplatz zu einigen wenigen Wohnmobilen und hoffe, dass die Nacht trocken und sturmfrei bleibt.

Von nun an geht es durch den Sintra Cascais Nationalpark, durch wunderschöne Wälder, vorbei an Schluchten und scheinbar undurchdringlichem Dickicht. Kurvig steigt die Straße stetig an. Das ist schweißtreibend aber der Mühe wert. In Sintra verzichte ich trotzdem auf den letzten Anstieg zur Altstadt, die steil auf den Klippen liegt. Das ist selbstverständlich echter Kulturfrevel. Dennoch kann ich mich in meinem Reisephlegma nicht auf touristendurchströmte Unesco Weltkulturerbeschlösser und Paläste einlassen, die zudem bei starkem Wind und unter tiefhängenden Regenwolken erst noch mit einem vollbepackten Fahrrad erschoben werden müssten. Ne Ne Ne…. Ich kehre in ein kleines Café ein, bestelle hausgemachte Suppe gefolgt von einem dicken Stück Schokoladen-kuchen und erlasse mir angesichts meines schweren Gemüts mildernde Umstände.

Als sich die grauen Wolken in ihr tiefstes Schwarz tauchen, was ich allerdings zuckerhigh durch die Schokoladenkuchendroge nicht wirklich als persönliche Bedrohung ansehe, schwinge ich mich wieder auf’s Rad und peile Ericeira an, einen Ort an der Küste, der in akzeptabler Nachmittagsdistanz liegt. Nicht weniger als zehn Minuten später, befinde ich mich im Kampf gegen hartnäckige Niederschlagsattacken. Unter gnadenlosen Wolkenbrüchen radle ich tapfer drei Stunden entlang der lauten Hauptstraße und freue mich über gar nichts mehr. In diesen aussichtslosen Momenten des Radfahrerdaseins wird der, meiner Ansicht nach, wichtigste Muskel trainiert, den man für eine Fernradreise benötigt – der Geist. Ich schnaufe und stöhne an der brüchigen Asphaltkante. Die Hügel sind hoch und steil und das Erklimmen wird durch zu viel Gepäck, Gegenwind und peitschende Regentropfen zusätzlich erschwert. Ich beginne zu grummeln, was bald schon zum Grollen wird. Mein Unmut steigert sich mit jeder Pedalumdrehung. In mir lodert blanke Wut und irgendwann platzt eine Schimpftirade aus mir heraus, die jedem Vulkanausbruch die Show stehlen würde. Wie glühende Lava schreie ich die primitivsten Fäkalfluchfachausdrücke, in den nassen Äther – gerne auch so oft hintereinander, dass daraus fast ein neues Wort entsteht – Fuckpissscheidreckkackpissfuckscheiß. Das dauert gefühlte fünf Minuten und kostet derart viel Kraft und am Ende die Qualität meiner Stimmbänder, dass ich in kläglichem Ächzen verstumme. Geändert hat sich an den äußeren Umständen nicht das Geringste. Der Regen strömt unbeirrt weiter auf mich nieder, der Wind hat nicht einmal mit der Wimper gezuckt und die Hügel bleiben einfach da wo sie sind, steil und hoch. Mir geht es äußerlich zwar nicht besser, innerlich konnte ich mich mit dieser Schreiattacke aber der aufgestauten Wut entledigen. Dadurch habe ich nun meinen Fokus vom Ärger über die äußeren Bedingungen auf den Ärger über mich selbst als tobendes, lächerliches Wesen gelenkt. Den Rest des Nachmittages verbringe ich damit, wütend auf mich selbst zu sein, dann mich über mich lustig zu machen, mich anschließend zu schämen, schließlich mein Verhalten zu analysieren, mir am Ende zu verzeihen und mich für meine Zähigkeit zu loben. In dieser und ähnlicher Weise ertrage ich mich bereits seit Beginn dieser Reise. Keineswegs nur vergnüglich. Jeden andere Reisegefährten mit diesem Benehmen hätte ich längst abgeschüttelt. Da das nicht möglich ist, versuche ich, meinen eigenen Dämon immer besser kennen zu lernen und zu zähmen. Das toppt jede Therapie!

In Ericeira steuere ich einen Supermarkt an, um mich für die kommenden Tage mit Proviant zu versorgen. Zehn Kilometer hinter dieser Stadt liegt irgendwo im Nirgendwo (nahe dem winzigen Ort Ribamar) ein Hostel, in dem ich vorhabe, mich zu verschanzen, bis der Regen aufhört. Die Wegbeschreibung aus dem Internet ist perfekt und schon bald stehe ich vor einem unscheinbaren Einfamilienhaus. Nirgends ist ein Hinweis auf ein Hostel zu sehen. Mein klatschnasses Dasein will schon fast den Mut verlieren, als sich auf mein stürmisches Klingeln doch noch die Haustür öffnet und zwei junge fragende Frauengesichter mein bedauerliches Äußeres bestaunen. Ob ich hier richtig im Hostel “Dos Hermanas” sei? Ihre Gesichter hellen sich auf. “Aber sicher, komm herein!” Auch diese Momente gehören zu den Gewürzen einer planfreien Reise. Gerade noch gibt es nicht den geringsten Anlass zum Frohsinn und nur einen winzigen Moment später gleicht die Welt einem Ponyhof. In einer Art Glückstaumel schiebe ich mein Fahrrad in die Garage und betrete ein ganz normales Wohnhaus. Großzügig geschnitten, Wohnzimmer mit Kamin, Küche mit allem drum und dran, Badezimmer mit “BADEWANNE” und ein Zimmer mit zwei Stockbetten, in dem ich alleine wohnen darf, da außer mir um diese Jahreszeit niemand auf die Idee kommt, hier Urlaub zu machen. Welch’ Glück ich allerdings wirklich habe, stellt sich schon bald heraus, als die beiden Schwestern – sie kommen übrigens aus Schweden – mir berichten, dass sie erst gestern von ihrem Winteraufenthalt aus der Nähe Stockholms zurückgekehrt seien. Hätte ich nur einen Tag früher an der Tür geklingelt, wäre niemand da gewesen. Die Geschwister haben das Haus gemeinsam mit ihren zwei Brüdern vergangenen Sommer gekauft, um sich ihren Traum zu erfüllen, und ein Hostel daraus zu machen. Moa und Natalie sind 32 und 28 Jahre alt. Sie werden nun Portugiesisch lernen und versuchen, ihren Broterwerb mit den angenehmen Dingen des Lebens zu verbinden, d.h. Menschen kennen zulernen, ihren Geschichten zu lauschen und sich im Meer und der Natur aufzuhalten. Unter uns liegt eine traumhafte Bucht, in der das wilde Wetter nur so wütet und die Wellen gegen den langen Strand schmettern. Im Sommer ist das gewiss ein idealer Spot zum Wellenreiten. Im Moment bin ich einfach nur glücklich, mich meiner nassen Sachen zu entledigen und ein heißes Bad zu nehmen. Das Wetter kann mir getrost den Buckel runterrutschen.

Vier Tage dauert der Sturm. Zeit zum Schlafen, Schreiben, Denken. Mit Moa und Natalie verstehe ich mich super. Natalie hat Ernährung und Diätetik studiert und bereitet morgens das Frühstück zu. Ihre selbst gebackenen Brötchen sind mein kulinarisches Tageshighlight. Am Wochenende nehmen sie mich auf einen Bauernmarkt im nahegelegenen Mafra mit. Alle Produkte scheinen direkt vom Acker zu kommen. Unter regennassen Planen schillern Obst und Gemüse in den kräftigsten Farben. Meine Einkäufe beschränken sich jedoch nur auf zwei Tomaten, eine Banane und einen Apfel. Als ich zahlen will, schaut mich der Verkäufer irritiert an und winkt mich freundlich fort. Seine Augen sagen: “Ach was soll’s! Nimm’ mit. Das ist ja so wenig, was soll ich dir berechnen?” Voller Dankbarkeit strahle ich ihm mein schönstes “Obrigada” entgegen. Das ist Portugal – das einzige Land im westlichen Europa, in dem ich diese Großzügigkeit erlebe.

Am morgen meiner fünften Nacht im temporär schwedischen Heim hat sich das Wetter beruhigt und weht mich mit zartem Seitenwind weiter die Küste nach Norden. Ich brauche zwei Tage bis ich Nazaré erreiche. Der Weg dorthin führt an traumhaften Buchten und schroffen Felswänden vorbei, durch versnobte Villengegenden mit ihren (mir verhassten) Golfplätzen, vorbei an stillen, fast ausgestorbenen Dörfern, durch duftende Felder mit Broccoli und Wirsing und durch immer wieder unwegsames Gelände. Ich genieße es, endlich wieder draußen zu sein und zumindest eine Nacht hinter den Dünen mein Zelt aufzubauen.

Mein Bewegungselan ist zurückgekehrt und ich bin gespannt auf Nazaré. Ein Fischerort, der für die höchsten Wellen der Welt(!) bekannt ist. Hier finden Surfmeisterschaften mit Profis rund um den Globus statt. Wellen von 20-30 Metern Höhe, sagt man werden gesurft. Unvorstellbar.
Da es gerade wieder zu nieseln beginnt, kehre ich in ein kleines Hostel ein. Der Besitzer, ein großer schwere Portugiese hat eine winzige Schürze um die Taille gewickelt und fuchtelt mit riesigen Pranken in der Luft herum, während seine donnernde Stimme erklärt, er habe heute den Bürgermeister zu Gast. Ich müsse entschuldigen, er müsse kochen und den Tisch decken “… und, ähem… “ es wäre von höchster Wichtigkeit und ausgesprochen hilfreich, wenn ich mich heute Abend in dem kleinen Speiseraum nicht blicken ließe. Er hätte wichtige Geschäfte mit dem Bürgermeister zu besprechen. Verblüfft starre ich ihn an und verschwinde im Mehrbettzimmer, was ich wieder ganz für mich alleine habe. Am nächsten Tag regnet es in Strömen. Antonio, der Gastwirt, serviert das Frühstück und plumpst neben mir an den Tisch. Ob ich gut geschlafen hätte und sie nicht zu laut gewesen seien. Ohne eine Antwort abzuwarten, verkündet er mit kräftigem Gelächter, dass der Abend ein voller Erfolg für ihn und die Stadt gewesen sei. Er konnte den Bürgermeister überzeugen, die Marke “Nazaré” und ihren Ruf als Surfmekka besser zu schützen. Welche Maßnahmen er dafür vorschlägt, bleibt mir allerdings ob seiner wirren wenn auch unmöglich zu überhörenden Ausführungen, schleierhaft. Mit einer unbändigen Energie und fast schon brutaler Stimmgewalt tönt er seine Ansichten über dies und jenes und ganz besonders Frau Merkel mit ihrer gescheiterten Europapolitik durch das Speisezimmer. Die übrigen Gäste sind längst verschwunden, mich aber interessiert diese ausdrucksvolle Persönlichkeit und so bleibe ich sitzen. Mamas selbst gemachte Konfitüre wird mir gönnerhaft als Nachschlag angeboten, während der Hausherr über die verheerende Portugiesische Wirtschaftssituation doziert. Hach, es sei ein Dilemma! Mord und Totschlag, Korruption und Vernichtung! Ginge es nach ihm, würde Portugal die Europäische Union selbstverständlich sofort verlassen. Aber die Politiker seien alle unfähig und obendrein auch korrupt. Er könnte heulen Wut. Ob ich denn wisse, dass die verheerenden Brände im vergangenen Jahr, die riesige Waldgebiete nördlich von Nazaré die gesamte Westküste entlang vernichtet hätten, ob ich denn wisse, dass das vom Staat initiierte Brände waren? Ja! Damit die staatliche Feuerwehr etwas zu tun bekäme. Der Beweis läge auf der Hand. Die Brände haben verheerend gewütet, aber ausgerechnet einen kleinen Luxusort an der Küste verschont, wo hochkarätige Politiker und ihre schwer edelsteinbesetzten Gattinnen pflegen, ihren Urlaubschampagner zu trinken. Was für ein Mysterium! Du wirst es sehen, wenn du dort lang fährst.

Er hat nicht untertrieben. Ohne die Monsterwellen gesehen zu haben, was ich sehr bedaure, verlasse ich Nazaré am kommenden Tag – dicke graue Regenwolken drohen schon wieder am Horizont – und gelange wenig später in die Gegend der Waldbrände. Mich erfasst eine tiefe Trauer. Vernichteter Wald, so weit das Auge reicht. Und wirklich… der kleine Ort Moel liegt still an der Küste, eingebettet in dickem Grün. Kein Halm hat hier Feuer gefangen. Antonio hat sich das vermutlich nicht ausgedacht. Der Tag begleitet mich mit einer wechselhaften Kulisse von Regen, Sonnen und viel Wind. Als ich am Abend Figueira da Foz erreiche, wird meine Zähigkeit noch einmal auf die Probe gestellt, denn ich muss eine hohe Brücke überqueren, über die unentwegt LKWs an mir vorbei donnern. Der starke Seitenwind fordert mich zusätzlich heraus. Ich stelle auf Autopilot – Blick starr nach vorn, Spur halten, einatmen, ausatmen, strampeln. Nach gefühlter Ewigkeit ist die andere Seite erreicht und ich werde mit einem häßlichen Neubau-Ort belohnt. Das Hostel ist erbärmlich, aber draußen schlafen ist nicht möglich bei dem unbeständigen Wetter.

Auch der folgende Tag ist wechselhaft und anstrengend. Mal schüttet es, dass ich kaum etwas sehe, dann scheint wieder die Sonne, dass ich in meiner Regenkluft fast ersticke. Am Abend erreiche ich einen Ort, an dem es eine Fähre zu einer Landzunge gibt, auf der es sich sicher bis Porto schön flach entlang radeln lässt… denke ich. Müde und hungrig bahne ich mir mühsam meinen Weg durch düstere graue Marine-Industrieanlagen bis zum Fähranleger. Ich habe Glück. In zehn Minuten kommt das Boot. Die Sonne ist bereits untergegangen. Es ist windig und eiskalt. Zitternd warte ich darauf, an Deck gehen zu können, doch werde bitter enttäuscht. Der Fährmann erklärt, dass es seit gestern eine Art Ersatzverkehr gibt. Fahrräder werden einen Monat lang nicht transportiert. Ich bitte, bettle, flehe, fluche… der Mann verzieht nicht die kleinste Mine und bleibt stur. Das bedeutet, ich muss den ganzen Weg durchs Industriegebiet zurückfahren und mir schnell noch eine Bleibe suchen, denn der Himmel färbt sich am Horizont in schauerliches Dunkelviolett, was bedrohlich und rasant näher kommt. Mit dem Rest meiner Energie, hochgezogenen Schultern und der Bestimmtheit eines Kamikazepiloten rase ich in die nächstgelegene Stadt und schleudere mit schotterspritzender Bremsung vor die Tore einer Jugendherberge, gerade als die ersten faustgroßen Regentropfen auf den Asphalt klatschen. Geschafft! Die Herbergsinnenausstattung stammt aus den frühen Siebzigern. Die Betten sind hier und da notdürftig repariert und knarren bei der kleinsten Bewegung. Alte Wolldecken mit ausgefransten Kanten, halb aus der Wand hängende Kleiderhaken und rostige Metallstuhlbeine schlummern im faden Licht des Achtbettzimmers. Nur eine kleine, fahrige Russin teilt es mit mir. Aus dem Nachbarzimmer scheppert hysterisches Mädchengekreisch. Die Russin schnarcht wie ein Bauarbeiter und ich… ? ich fühle mich seltsam geborgen. In meiner kläglich geschrumpften Provianttasche finde ich noch eine Notration. In solchen Momenten schmecken Tütensuppen köstlich. Ehrlich!

Am nächsten Tag radle ich schnurstracks zum Bahnhof, kaufe für vier Euro ein Ticket und treffe eine gute Stunde später in Porto ein. Genug der Schikanen, es ist Zeit, mich auch mal wieder zu freuen.

Und Porto erfreut mich! Schon als ich aus dem wunderschönen, gefliesten Inneren des Bahnhofsgebäude trete, erfasst mich eine Welle der Wonne. Ich verweile im Sonnenlicht, stehe einfach nur da und betrachte die schmalen Häuser, die Turmspitzen, die sich hoch und runter windenden Gassen, die bemalten, blauen Fliesen, Menschen an Deck der Sight Seeing Doppeldecker, Kellner in weißen Hemden und schwarzen Schürzen, schweißglitzernde Bauarbeiter, Busfahrer, Hunde, bunte Blumentöpfe, grüne Fensterläden, Schornsteine und moosbewachsene Ziegel, Straßenlaternen und filigrane Balkongeländer, Schaufenster mit angeklebten zerfledderten Plakaten oder blitzblanken Auslagen, flatternde Werbebanner, Straßenmusikanten… Hach! Zu Fuß schlendere ich durch die steilen Straßen zu meinem Hostel, mache Momentaufnahmen und lasse mich verzaubern.

Ohne Sehenswürdigkeitenabklapperplan, lasse ich mich die nächsten vier Tage ziellos durch die Gassen Portos treiben. Viele Fassaden der alten Häuser sind gefliest, oft mit blauen oder grünen handgemalten Motiven, die sogar auf einigen wichtigen Gebäuden der Stadt vollständige Bilder ergeben – ganze Geschichten erzählen. Die Balkone sind schmiedeeisern und in aufwendige Muster gebogen. Fensterläden oder Jalousien liegen wie Augenlider über den Rahmen. An den Haustüren prangen Türklopfer, mal als Löwenmaul, mal als Hand oder Gesicht. Überall strahlen Graffiti von den Fassaden. Lebendige Kunst, gegenwärtig, vergänglich. Street-Art gehört zum heutigen Portugal, wie die antiken gemusterten Fliesen. Fassaden, die Geschichten erzählen. Botschafter der Zeit. Manche Häuser sind so verrottet, das eine Renovierung fast ausgeschlossen scheint. Vermutlich werden sie früher oder später abgerissen. Dann wachsen dort Neubauten, wie ich in den Bezirken ausserhalb des Zentrums oft sehen kann. Nicht unbedingt immer gut gelungen.


Ich durchstreife einen Park und lande unbemerkt im Zentrum. Schmale Gassen mäandern als Fußgängerzone durch die Altstadt. Souvenirläden, Tabakgeschäfte, Bäcker und Restaurants warten geduldig rechts und links des Weges auf Kundschaft. An einer Ecke sitzen Vater und Sohn auf dem Bürgersteig. Beide drehen mit der einen Hand die Kurbel einer Drehorgel. Die andere Hand empfängt eine sorgsam gefalteten Lochkarten, die durch die Kurbeldrehung in einem Schlitz der Orgel verschwindet, und auf der anderen Seite wieder zutage kommt. Der Junge ist schätzungsweise zehn Jahre alt. Er trägt eine Pudelmütze und eine braune, fellgefütterte Jacke. Auf seiner Schulter nestelt eine Art Kakadu und knabbert dem Knaben am Ohr. Der verzieht keine Mine, sondern kurbelt in gleichbleibender Geschwindigkeit, während der Vater, bekleidet mit einem bordeauxroten Strickpulli ein eigentümliches Lächeln im Gesicht hat und liebevoll sein Instrument bewegt. Er wiegt sich sachte hin und her, dabei hebt und senkt er rhythmisch seinen Fuss, an dem eine Manschette mit kleinen Schellen befestigt ist. Die beiden haben sich eine Art Bühne gebaut, die ihre Darbietung eher wie ein Schauspiel, denn wie eine Bettelei aussehen lässt. Auf einem Holzklotz steht ein weißer, lebendiger Hahn, der ab und zu mit seinem Kopf ruckt. Ein Gartenzwerg bewacht ihn. Bücher und weitere Percussion-Instrumente liegen zu Füssen des Vaters. Der Junge sitzt auf einer Decke, neben ihm ein altertümlicher kleiner Koffer, gefüllt mit Lochkarten für seine Leier. Stapel von Büchern, geöffnete Kisten mit antiken Gerätschaften runden das Szenario ab. Sobald der Junge eine Spielpause hat, setzt er sich zurück auf einen winzigen Schemel und vertieft sich in ein Comicheft – Tintin (Tim und Struppi). Es bilden sich Trauben knipsender Menschen, die begeistert klatschen. Im verbeulten Hut klimpern die Münzen, der Vater bedankt sich mit einem bescheidenen Lächeln und Kopfnicken. Die beiden sehen aus, als stammten sie aus einer anderen Zeit, ebenso die Musik klingt aus dieser Ferne. Ob sie Reisende sind? Woher sie wohl kommen? Hat der Junge ebenso viel Spaß and er Show, wie sein Vater? Was treibt sie, wo leben sie und wo ist die Mutter des Jungen? Während ich meinen Weg fortsetze, stelle ich mir eine abenteuerliche Geschichte zu den Musikanten vor. Dass sie einfach nur um die Ecke wohnen und ihre Inszenierung eine bloße Touristenattraktion sein soll, lehne ich ab zu denken.

Porto liegt am Fluss Douro. Eine riesige Stahlbrücke verbindet sie mit dem anderen Ufer. Eiffel hat sie gebaut. Oben fährt die Straßenbahn, unten fahren die Autos. Die Stadt zeigt sich von der anderen Uferseite äußerst fotogen. Alte Fischerboote mit riesigen Holzfässer liegen wie an einer Perlenschnur vor dem Panorama der bunten Häuserpromenade. Touristen werden sanft mit Souvenirs und Bootsrundfahrten gelockt. In Porto schlummert eine fühlbare Gemütlichkeit. Die Menschen sitzen in der Sonne, schnurren hier und da einen portugiesischen Plausch, verweilen auf Parkbänken, füttern Möven und träumen. Ich nehme ihre positive Energie auf, gebe mich ihrem Rhythmus hin und bin einfach glücklich hier zu sein.

In der Innenstadt gibt es einen Buchladen, für den man Eintritt zahlen muß, um dort einzukaufen. Die Tickets dafür muss man vorher in einem anderen Geschäft erwerben, vor dem sich eine lange Menschenschlange rekelt. Die damals – so sagt man – von Sozialhilfe lebende K.J. Rowling lebte einige Zeit in Porto, ließ sich von der Stadt und ganz besonders von eben diesem Buchladen “Livraria Lello” inspirieren und schrieb hier Teile der Harry Potter Romane. Kaum betrete ich diese Buchhandlung weiß ich, welcher Zauber die Mutter ihrer Inspiration war und obschon es wie eine Zeitreise erscheint und einfach wunderbar dort ist, überkommt mich auch eine gewisse Melancholie und die Vorahnung von einem Massentourismus, der Porto vermutlich schon bald immer stärker heimsuchen wird.


Meine Tage vergehen mit Spaziergängen und Fotografieren. Ansonsten ruhe ich mich aus und sammle Kräfte für die nächste Etappe. Ich verlasse die Stadt, wie ich gekommen bin, mit der Bahn. So erspare ich mir die Fahrt durch häßliches Industriegebiet. In einem kleinen Vorort, eine Stunde vor den Stadttoren empfängt mich ein wunderbarer Wanderweg, der sich kilometerlang durch die Dünen zieht und für Radfahrer verboten ist. Da allerdings weit und breit kein Spaziergänger zu sehen ist, verzichte ich auf Gehorsam und rattere munter über die schmalen Holzplanken. Das Wetter ist angenehm, die See rauh und windig und meine Stimmung bestens, als ich abends im kleinen Grenzort Gaminha ankomme. Auf der anderen Seite des Flusses liegt Spanien. Meine letzte Nacht in Portugal verbringe ich auf dem einsamen Parkplatz neben dem Fährschiff, und schon um kurz nach neun Uhr am anderen Morgen setze ich nach Spanien über. Ich bin in Galizien!

180321_06

…ich bin nicht so DICK, wie ich aussehe … ich habe ALLE Klamotten an, die ich habe!

Lisbon (en)

25. February 2018 – 05. March 2018       deutsche Fassung


Sometimes I imagine a situation, imagine in my mind how an encounter, a city, a region could be and the longer I look at the future event from the present, the clearer I see it with my inner eye in front of me. However, I am all the more astonished when the real events then develop so completely against my imagination.

The reunion with my friend Antje in Lisbon is a turning point.

Initially everything goes according to plan… Her plane lands in the early evening. A short time later in the hallway of our small AirB&B apartment we are in each other’s arms. We haven’t seen each other for almost two years. Our joy fills the present with grins and giggles and chatter and smiles. Then our stomachs growl and we stagger into the narrow alleys of the redlighted neighbourhood of the Alfama quarter. We are passing small bars, in front of which crowds of people holding beer bottles, we are passing hastily hurrying people with their heads drawn in in high collars, we are passing crackling street grills on which the crispy skins of thick fish let the water drip out of the corner of our mouths. For a while we drift astray over cobblestones, in dim light, around acutely angled corners until our indecision drives us into a small tapas bar. Many small delicacies in tiny bowls are served. Accompanied by Portuguese red wine. Antje looks around again and again in disbelief. Just a moment ago she was still in cold Berlin, now a nasally mumbling waiter is buzzing around us with bean vegetables and wine bottles, while melancholic fado songs numb our tired ears. Somewhat culturally shocked Antje tries to get there here and now and I am jittery and full of joyful expectation to explore the city in her company for the next five days.

The next morning, right after breakfast, we boot across the city centre down to the banks of the Tejo river. At the „Praça do Comércio“ (commercial centre), tourists romp around in the warm February sun. Once stood here the Royal Palace, which served as the residence of the Portuguese kings for over 200 years, until the devastating earthquake of 1755 razed the entire lower city of Lisbon to the ground. What was not destroyed by the earthquake fell victim to the flames and finally to a massive tsunami. Almost a third of the population died at that time. Then the lower part of Lisbon was rebuild again as we know it today. Spacious squares with statues and fountains, wide shopping streets flanked by the tiled facades and wide promenades typical of Portugal. Along this promenade we stroll to the famous fish market and soon up to Barrio Alto. Lisbon stretches over seven hills. Cycling is certainly not much fun here. It goes steeply up and down again. The sun is shining in the cloudy sky, we drink coffee and feast on the famous „Pastel de Nata“ – delicious puff pastries with vanilla cream filling, take pictures of the picturesque house facades, graffiti and clotheslines until we finally return to our cosy apartment exhausted from the stairs up and down.

Antje still doesn’t really seem to have arrived today. She’s very thoughtful all day long. No wonder, her work hasn’t let her breathe much in the last few months. Our discussions focus primarily on the stressful everyday life in Germany, the political situation, the refugee situation, responsibility, burden, problems. I am becoming increasingly aware of how diametrically opposed our current life situations are. Suddenly I am overcome by an immense heaviness and sadness. Dark circles around her eyes and worry lines dominate my friend’s face. I would so love to help her. It seems to me, from her point of view, I am in my current life as a globetrotter, nobody who could really understand her situation. She takes note of my timid suggestions for a change of perspective with a tired smile.

I’m getting more and more downhearted every day. This suits the weather, because already on the second day it starts to rain and storm. Nevertheless, we take a long walk along the windy promenade. Surprisingly Antje thrives on the stormy sea. The wilder the roaring waves hurl their white spray towards the shore, the more violently the wind pulls at clothing and hairstyle, the happier my girlfriend seems to be. I wish the storm would dispel her worries in all directions and not make her laugh only on her outside.

We walk under the impressive „Ponte de 25 Abril“. The suspension bridge is about three kilometres long, reminiscent of the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco and was actually built by the same company in 1962-1966. Shortly before the Millennium, the bridge was extended from four to six lanes. Two railway lanes were installed under the carriageways. There is a deafening buzzing and purring as one walks under the 70-metre-high floating routes. No wonder: 150,000 cars pass the bridge every day on average.

Finally we reach the „Padrão dos Descobrimentos“ – the monument of discoveries. On the flanks of a concrete block similar to a ship’s bow, bright limestone statues of famous Portuguese explorers and seafaring personalities can be seen. It pays special tribute to Prince Henry the Navigator, who more than 500 years ago – due to his thirst for adventure and financial resources – turned Portugal into a dominant European trading metropolis in the 15th and 16th centuries.

Meanwhile the wind whistles properly when we arrive at the „Torre de Belém“. It was built together with a twin tower on the other side of the river to welcome incoming ships. This allowed enemy ships to be placed in the crossfire, if necessary. The earthquake destroyed the second tower, only the tower of Belém has been preserved and is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The following day the storm increased so much that the promenade is now closed due to flooding. So we content ourselves with visiting a flea market in the Garcia quarter – which is of course located on one of the hills that must be climbed with difficulty – and then take a ride on one of the old wooden trams, famous for Lisbon. The city tour is not really fun with the continuous rain showers. Fortunately, there are small cafés and restaurants everywhere, in which we can save ourselves from the damp sky attacks. The places far away from the tourist routes are the most comfortable, authentic and cheapest. Paper mats and toothpick cups decorate the tables. The Lord of the House, an approximately mid-60 year old man in green corduroy pants and suspenders, welcomes us warmly and describes in a mixture of Portuguese, Spanish and English as well as he can the two dishes of the day that are available. In the absence of sufficient vocabulary knowledge, we simply order both menus, but can eat at most half of the rich amount of rabbit meat, thick beans, potatoes and whatnot. The innkeeper’s wife stands behind the bar and polishes wine glasses. With friendly laughter lines around her mouth and eyes she inquires whether her food tastes good to us, while the daughter calls from the kitchen that we could have a second helping. At least, that’s what it sounds like.

No improvement in the weather is to be expected in the coming days. Our mood isn’t exactly cheerful either. Antje is in a real dilemma, because on her short vacation, of all things, hell has broken loose in her job. She would love to get on the plane immediately and leave again. So she is actually not present at all. These are not exactly great conditions for unbridled happiness.

On our last day together we visit the former Expo area on the north-eastern bank of the Tejo River despite alternating rain and wind attacks. We even dare a ride with the cable car high above the shore. From here we have a magnificent view of the second bridge that connects Lisbon with the southern Tejo shore. The Vasco Da Gama Bridge is the longest bridge in Europe and one of the longest in the world. We would certainly be more impressed by it mighty sight if the wind were not so violent on our gondola. I’m glad to have solid ground under my feet again.

Our last morning arrives and before we know it, we say goodbye again and return to our world for ourselves.

During the many weeks of my bicycle trip I came into contact with a wide variety of people and fates. Some were heartbreaking, even tragic, some touching, some cheerful, energetic, enviable. Again and again I look at my own life, my origins, my possibilities. I am privileged and increasingly aware of this. Full of gratitude I enjoy every new day in a freedom that I could create for myself. I’m glad I had the strength to make that decision. The reunion with Antje is not the expected and longed-for meeting of two friends who have not seen each other for a long time and have much to tell each other, it is not the joyful common experience of a great city by the sea, and not the chuckling and giggling and making plans of two familiar people – our reunion is the clash of two extreme forms of life. For me, our encounter is on the one hand an unexpected insight into my approaching future, which begins with the end of my journey, and on the other hand a look back into the past, when I consciously turned my back on everyday urban work because it crushed me. Antje – overworked, stricken and melancholy – is like a messenger from this world to which I will return sooner or later. After twenty months of travelling, my perspective has shifted to urban life. I’m not sure I can and will reintegrate there. Days after our reunion, I am still stunned by the violence with which the thought of an uncertain future penetrates my present freedom. It takes quite a while before I find the lightness of my being again. Somewhere deep inside me a shadow has formed, which accompanies me from now on.

dig

Lissabon (de)

25. Februar 2018 – 05. März 2018  english version


Manchmal stelle ich mir eine Situation vor, male mir in Gedanken aus, wie eine Begegnung, eine Stadt, eine Gegend sein könnte und je länger ich aus der Gegenwart auf das zukünftige Ereignis blicke, desto klarer sehe ich es mit meinem inneren Auge vor mir. Umso verblüffter bin ich allerdings auch, wenn sich das reale Geschehen dann so gänzlich wider meiner Vorstellung entwickelt.

Das Wiedersehen mit meiner Freundin Antje in Lissabon ist eine Zäsur.

Anfangs läuft noch alles nach Plan…Ihr Flieger landet am frühen Abend. Kurze Zeit später fallen wir uns im Flur unseres kleinen AirB&B Apartments um den Hals. Fast zwei Jahre haben wir uns nicht gesehen. Unsere Freude füllt die Gegenwart mit Grinsen und Gackern und Plappern und Strahlen. Dann knurren unsere Mägen und wir taumeln in die engen Gassen der rotlichtigen Nachbarschaft des Alfama-Viertels. Vorbei an kleinen Bars, vor denen Bierflaschenhaltende Menschentrauben hängen, vorbei an hastig Eilenden mit eingezogenen Köpfen in hochgestellten Kragen, vorbei an knisternden Straßengrills auf denen die knusprigen Häute dicker Fische uns das Wasser aus den Mundwinkel tropfen lässt. Irrend treiben wir eine ganze Weile weiter über Kopfsteinpflaster, in schummriger Beleuchtung, um spitzwinkelige Ecken, bis unsere Unentschlossenheit uns in eine kleine Tapas-Bar treibt. Vielerlei kleine Köstlichkeiten in winzigen Schalen werden serviert. Dazu gibt es portugiesischen Rotwein. Antje schaut sich immer wieder ungläubig um. Gerade war sie noch im winterlich kalten Berlin, nun schwirrt in zwielichtigem Flackern ein nasal nuschelnder Kellner mit Bohnengemüse und Weinflaschen um uns herum, während melancholhaltige Fadogesänge unsere müden Ohren betäuben. Einigermaßen kulturgeschockt versucht Antje, im hier und jetzt anzukommen und ich bin hibbelig und voll freudiger Erwartung, die kommenden fünf Tage in ihrer Gesellschaft die Stadt zu erkunden.

Am nächsten Morgen stiefeln wir gleich nach dem Frühstück quer durch die Innenstadt hinunter zum Ufer des Tejo. Am “Praça do Comércio” (Handelsplatz) tummeln sich die Touristen in der warmen Februarsonne. Einst stand hier der Königspalast, der über 200 Jahre als Residenz der portugiesischen Könige diente, bis das verheerende Erdbeben von 1755 die komplette Unterstadt Lissabons dem Erdboden gleich machte. Was nicht durch das Beben zerstört wurde, fiel den Flammen und schließlich einem gewaltigen Tsunami zum Opfer. Fast ein Drittel der Bevölkerung kam damals ums Leben. Danach entstand der untere Teil Lissabons wie wir ihn heute kennen. Großzügige Plätze mit Statuen und Springbrunnen, breite Einkaufsstraßen flankiert von den für Portugal so typischen gefliesten Hausfassaden und weite Uferpromenaden. Entlang dieser Promenade schlendern wir zur berühmten Fisch-Markthalle und bald schon hinauf ins Barrio Alto. Lissabon zieht sich über sieben Hügel. Fahrradfahren macht hier sicher wenig Spaß. Es geht steil bergan und wieder bergab. Die Sonne scheint am schäfchenbewölkten Himmel, wir trinken Kaffee und schlemmen die berühmten “Pastel de Nata” – köstliche Blätterteigpasteten mit Vanillesahnecremefüllung, knipsen uns durch die pittoresken Hausfassaden, Graffiti und Wäscheleinen, bis wir schließlich erschöpft vom Trepp-auf-Trepp-ab in unser gemütliches Appartement zurückkehren.

Antje scheint auch heute noch nicht wirklich angekommen zu sein. Sie ist den gesamten Tag über sehr nachdenklich. Kein Wunder, ihre Arbeit hat sie in den letzten Monaten kaum Luft holen lassen. So drehen sich unsere Gespräche vorrangig um den anstrengenden Alltag in Deutschland, die politische Situation, die Flüchtlingslage, Verantwortung, Belastung, Probleme. Immer deutlicher erkenne ich, wie diametral unsere derzeitigen Lebenssituationen sich gegenüberstehen. Plötzlich überkommt mich eine ungeheure Schwere und Traurigkeit. Im Gesicht meiner Freundin dominieren dunkle Augenringen und Sorgenfalten. Ich würde ihr so gerne helfen. Mir scheint, aus ihrer Sicht, bin ich in meinem aktuellen Globetrotterleben, niemand, der ihre Lage wirklich verstehen könnte. Meine zaghaften Perspektivwechselblickanregungen nimmt sie müde lächelnd zu Kenntnis.

Von Tag zu Tag werde ich niedergeschlagener. Das passt zum Wetter, denn schon am zweiten Tag beginnt es zu regnen und zu stürmen. Trotzdem machen wir einen langen Spaziergang an der windigen Promenade entlang. Erstaunlicherweise blüht Antje am stürmischen Meer auf. Je wilder die tosenden Wogen ihre weiße Gischt dem Ufer entgegen schleudern, je heftiger der Wind an Kleidung und Frisur zerrt, desto glücklicher scheint meine Freundin zu sein. Ich wünschte, der Sturm würde ihre Sorgen in alle Himmelsrichtungen zerstreuen und sie nicht nur äusserlich zum Strahlen bringen.

Wir laufen unter der beeindruckenden “Ponte de 25 Abril” hindurch. Die ca. drei Kilometer lange Hängebrücke erinnert ein wenig an die Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco und ist tatsächlich vom selben Unternehmen 1962-1966 gebaut worden. Kurz vor dem Millennium wurde die Brücke von vier auf sechs Spuren erweitert. Unter den Fahrbahnen wurden zwei Eisenbahnspuren installiert. Es herrscht ein ohrenbetäubendes Surren und Schnurren, wenn man unter der in 70 Meter Höhe schwebenden Trassen hindurch läuft. Kein Wunder: täglich passieren durchschnittlich 150.000 Autos die Brücke.

Schließlich gelangen wir zum “Padrão dos Descobrimentos”  – dem Denkmal der Entdeckungen. An den Flanken eines schiffsbugähnlichen Betonblocks sind helle Kalkstein-Statuen berühmter portugiesische Entdecker, bzw. Seefahrer-Persönlichkeiten zu sehen. Es huldigt ganz besonders Prinz Heinrich dem Seefahrer, der vor mehr als 500 Jahren durch seine Abenteuerlust und finanziellen Mitteln im 15. und 16. Jahrhundert aus Portugal eine dominante europäische Handelsmetropole machte.

Der Wind pfeift inzwischen ordentlich, als wir am “Torre de Belém” ankommen. Er wurde zusammen mit einem Zwillingsturm auf der anderen Seite des Flusses zur Begrüßung ankommender Schiffe gebaut. So konnten gegebenenfalls feindliche Schiffe ins Kreuzfeuer genommen werden. Das Erdbeben hat den zweiten Turm vernichtet, nur der Turm von Belém blieb erhalten und gehört heute zum UNESCO Weltkulturerbe.

Am kommenden Tag hat der Sturm derartig zugenommen, dass die Uferpromenade inzwischen wegen Überflutung gesperrt ist. So begnügen wir uns mit dem Besuch eines Flohmarktes im Garcia Viertel – das liegt selbstverständlich auf einem der Hügel, der mühsam erklommen werden muss – und fahren anschließend eine Runde mit der für Lissabon berühmten hölzernen Straßenbahn. Wirklich Spaß macht die Stadtbesichtigung bei den andauernden Regenschauern nicht. Zum Glück gibt es überall kleine Cafés und Restaurants, in die wir uns vor den feuchten Himmelsattacken retten können. Die Lokale fern ab der Touristenrouten sind die gemütlichsten, authentischsten und preiswertesten. Papierdeckchen und Zahnstocherbecher zieren die Tische. Der Herr des Hauses, ein schätzungsweise Mitte sechzig jähriger Mann in grüner Cordhose und Hosenträgern, begrüßt uns herzlich und schildert so gut er kann auf portugisisch-spanisch-englisch die beiden Tagesgerichte, die heute zur Auswahl stehen. Mangels ausreichender Vokabelkenntnisse, bestellen wir einfach beide Menüs, können allerdings höchstens die Hälfte der reichhaltigen Berge von Kaninchenfleisch, dicken Bohnen, Kartoffeln und was weiß ich nicht noch allem, verzehren. Die Gastwirt-Gattin steht hinter dem Tresen und poliert Weingläser. Mit freundlichen Lachfältchen um Mund und Augen erkundigt sie sich, ob uns ihr Essen schmeckt, während die Tochter aus der Küche ruft, dass wir gerne noch einen Nachschlag haben könnten. Jedenfalls klingt es so.

Die kommenden Tage ist keine Wetterbesserung zu erwarten. Auch unsere Stimmung ist nicht gerade heiter. Antje befindet sich in einer echten Zwickmühle, denn ausgerechnet in ihrem Kurzurlaub brennt über ihrem heimischen Arbeitshimmel gerade die Luft. Am liebsten würde sie sofort in den Flieger steigen und wieder abreisen. So ist sie de facto gar nicht anwesend. Das sind nicht gerade tolle Voraussetzungen für ungezügelte Fröhlichkeit.

An unserem letzten gemeinsamen Tag besuchen wir trotz sich treu abwechselnder Regen- und Windattacken das ehemalige Expo Gelände am nordöstlichen Ufer des Tejo. Wir wagen sogar eine Fahrt mit der Seilbahn hoch über dem Ufer. Von hier aus haben wir einen prächtigen Blick auf die zweite Brücke, die Lissabon mit dem südlichen Tejo-Ufer verbindet. Die Vasco Da Gama Brücke ist die längste Brücke Europas und eine der längsten der Welt. Wir wären sicher tiefer von ihrem gewaltigen Anblick beeindruckt, würde der Wind nicht so heftig an unserer Gondel zerren. Ich bin froh, wieder festen Boden unter den Füssen zu haben.

Unser letzter Morgen bricht an und ehe wir es uns versehen, verabschieden wir uns schon wieder und kehren jeder für sich in seine Welt zurück.

In den vielen Wochen meiner Fahrradreise bin ich mit unterschiedlichsten Menschen und Schicksalen in Berührung gekommen. Manche waren herzzerreissend, gar tragisch, einige rührend, andere fröhlich, energetisch, beneidenswert. Immer wieder betrachte ich dann mein eigenes Leben, meine Herkunft, meine Möglichkeiten. Ich bin privilegiert und mir dessen immer häufiger bewusst. Voller Dankbarkeit genieße ich jeden neuen Tag in einer Freiheit, die ich mir selber schaffen konnte. Ich bin glücklich, dass ich die Kraft hatte, diese Entscheidung getroffen zu haben. Das Wiedersehen mit Antje ist nicht die erwartete und ersehnte Zusammenkunft zweier Freunde, die sich lange nicht gesehen und sich viel zu erzählen haben, sie ist nicht das freudige gemeinsam Erleben einer großartigen Stadt am Meer, sie ist nicht das Glucksen und Kichern und Pläne schmieden zweier vertrauter Menschen – unser Wiedersehen ist das Aufeinanderprallen von zwei extremen Lebensformen. Für mich ist unsere Begegnung einerseits der unerwartete Einblick in meine nahende Zukunft, die mit dem Ende meiner Reise beginnt, und andererseits der Rückblick in die Vergangenheit, als ich dem urbanen Arbeitsalltag bewusst den Rücken kehrte, weil er mich erdrückte. Antje – überarbeitet, angeschlagen und schwermütig – ist wie ein Bote aus dieser Welt, in die ich früher oder später zurückkehren werde. Nach zwanzig Monaten auf Reisen hat sich meine Perspektive zum urbanen Leben verschoben. Ich bin mir nicht sicher, ob ich mich dort wieder integrieren kann und will. Noch Tage nach unserem Wiedersehen, bin ich wie betäubt von der Gewalt, mit der der Gedanke an eine ungewisse Zukunft in meine gegenwärtige Freiheit dringt. Es dauert eine ganze Weile, bis ich die Leichtigkeit meines Seins wieder finde. Irgendwo tief in mir hat sich ein Schatten gebildet, der mich von nun an begleitet.

dig

Algarve | from Faro to Lisboa

08. Februar 2018 – 24. Februar 2018           deutsche Fassung


Finally I steer my bike into the bumpy streets of Faro’s quiet old town. The main road along the coastal towns was quite annoying at the end. The sky has closed up, it has become colder. Now I stand quite exhausted in front of a narrow old building with a green door. „Casa de la Madalena“, my chosen hostel. There is no bell. I’ll knock. Three moments later a young woman with a round face and blonde hair opens the door, waves me in and asks for a moment of patience. I’m standing… where? At reception? In the kitchen? In the dining room or at the fireplace? The area is all in one. Natural stone walls, terracotta tiles and wooden ceiling flicker earth-coloured in the reflection of the fire from the boiling stove. The green door opens again and Adrién, the owner, enters. A sporty man, in his early forties with a broad face, dark five-day beard and a friendly smile welcomes me warmly. When I learn that there is still a bed available for the night, a sigh of happiness escapes me, but it immediately dies with a sad finish when I hear the price. SEVENTEEN Euro in an EIGHT-bed room. After all, breakfast included. This is clearly too much for my travel budget. I instinctively retreat and push back to the exit. „If you stay longer, I’ll make you a special price,“ Adrién winking. I stay a whole week with a reduced daily rate, one night even free of charge, my laundry is washed and every morning there are pancakes made by the boss himself. Nothing like such a nice bargain!

My stay in Faro is wonderful. The fact that I don’t leave the next day gives me a certain idleness. Other than usual – constantly pursued by my guilty conscience, not having seen all sights, not having visited every church and climbed every tower – I am completely relaxed in this southern Portuguese idyll for once. There are no UNESCO World Heritage sites to visit here, but rather walls on which South Atlantic climate conferences are recorded in layered patina. The plaster puff pastry is crowned with graffiti – at least for me – like visiting a museum of most precious paintings. Apart from the roughness of the materials such as plaster, stone, mortar, plaster, wood, dirt, moss, stone and what else – the colours of the house walls are the actual protagonists. Red, so bloody and rusty, green so modest and dark and blue so thick and fleeting. Once proud and royal, it smashed its indigo towards the sky with all its might. „Look how blue I can be!“ Now it is furrowed by moisture and mould, covered, patched with mortar and plaster, greyed, forgotten. Still there, tired, stained, iridescent. And then the yellow… the yellow… the yellow! His existence begins completely innocently with a sunny complexion, clear and self-confident. But then it begins to dilute, becomes softened, disappears, mixes, becomes dirty, dark and brittle. His colour power is over, only his cheerful pigment shimmers pale, shows sadly how it could be, but is no longer. Not only the walls are like paintings, but also the frames! A long time ago, they were refined with glossy, precious lacquer. Now this is blown away in layers by window and door frames. Cracked, sharp-edged, inimitable cracks into the past. The decay is inhabited by pigeons cooing on narrow ledges. Broken discs jaggedly surround the blurred rottenness behind it. Graffiti sets strong colour accents over the patina. Political, versatile, lively. I can’t get enough of this niche art, the alley paintings.